Not Allowed to wear the Christian Cross at work. Violation of religious freedom? European Court of Human Rights will rule


In 2006, Nadia Eweida a British Airways worker, was suspended for wearing what her employers said was a violation of the since-modified uniform code. BA had a policy of not permitting additions to the uniform and so ordered Ms Eweida to follow the rules. She refused and claimed religious discrimination.

Shirley Chaplin left her 31-year nursing career after refusing to hide or remove the cross she wore on a necklace chain. The NHS trust‘s uniform and dress code prohibits front-line staff from wearing any type of necklace be that a crucifix or any chain in case patients try to grab them. They offered Mrs Chaplin the compromise of wearing her cross pinned inside a uniform lapel or pocket, but she said being asked to hide her faith was “disrespectful”.

A case heading to the European Court of Human Rights will determine whether two British women can be penalized for wearing a Christian cross at work.

Christian groups in Britain have expressed outrage at the controversy.

Ministers will argue that the display of a cross is “not a requirement of Christian faith” in the manner of a Sikh turban or Muslim hijab.   Last week The Archbishop of Canterbury has announced that the cross should be seen as “religious decoration” rather than a Christian requirement.

The government will also say that wearing a cross is not a requirement of Christianity, so wearing one in public is not protected by the law.  The The British government is the defendant in the case.

The matter is likely to hinge on interpretation of Article 9 of the European Convention on Human Rights, which offers wide latitude in freedom of religion.

Article 9 – Freedom of thought, conscience and religion

1. Everyone has the right to freedom of thought, conscience and religion; this right includes freedom to change his religion or belief and freedom, either alone or in community with others and in public or private, and to manifest his religion or belief, in worship, teaching, practice and observance.

2. Freedom to manifest one’s religion or beliefs shall be subject only to such limitations as are prescribed by law and are necessary in a democratic society in the interests of public safety, for the protection of public order, health or morals, or for the protection of the rights and freedoms of others.

Cityfella

Published by CityFella

Moved to the Big Tomata in the nineties from San Francisco. No Suburbs for me with its single colored houses and lawns and the excitement of pulling out my trash can once a week. I'm a CityFella , a part time New Yorker. I'm happiest in the Center City where people the streets and people are alive. I'm still waiting to buy a 34th floor condo somewhere downtown/Midtown with a nightclub. "Hurry I'm old" My politics are somewhere in the middle with a needle that constantly moves. I'm too liberal to be a Republican and too conservative to be a Democrat. Everything interests me . I've come to love Sacratomato, Its a nice town in cheap sensible shoes .

2 thoughts on “Not Allowed to wear the Christian Cross at work. Violation of religious freedom? European Court of Human Rights will rule

  1. In Saudi Arabia, all citizens are qureired to be Muslims, and the public practice of other religions is forbidden. Private practice of other religions is sometimes allowed and sometimes persecuted; there is no law protecting even this.Iran is officially a Twelver Shiite state. Some other religions (Christianity, Judaism, Zoroastrianism) are permitted, but are not allowed to proselytize; and they are sometimes persecuted even if they don’t. The Bahai faith is not allowed at all. Sunni Muslims are subject to some restrictions also.In China, all religious organizations have to be authorized by the government. This has given rise to conflict when the government appoints religious leaders different from what the religion itself chooses. There are state-appointed Catholic, Protestant, Buddhist, Taoist, and Muslim leaders. These are not always approved by the religious organizations outside of China. Those who practice religion outside these state-approved organizations are subject to severe persecution.In Turkey, since the secularization by Ataturk in the early 20th century, the government permits all religions but keeps them all under close surveillance. Special religious clothing (the veil, the fez) is not permitted to be worn in public. Turkey is predominantly Muslim, and there is some prejudice against other religions.In North Korea, virtually no religious practice is allowed except a limited amount by foreigners. Worship is considered a political offense.Cuba was for years officially atheist, and religious practice was seriously discouraged, with some persecution. But now religious people are even allowed to join the Communist Party. The government is secular rather than atheist, and religious practice is pretty much free.These are a few varied examples of governments which have restricted religious practice. In our time, the States that restrict religious freedom are mostly Muslim or Atheist.I can’t think of any other belief system that does this in modern times.Religion is the source of meaning and values for many people, and restricting it restricts the growth of the human soul. In countries where a religion is imposed, it loses some of its growth potential. In countries where religion is not restricted or mandated by the government, it flourishes and leads to better values and ways of life.

    Like

Comments are closed.

%d bloggers like this: