Why it’s now the bride who wears the trousers


Women are ditching frothy gowns to make their vows in jumpsuits or white separates

Sophie Turner at her wedding to Joe Jonas (second left) in Las Vegas.

Sophie Turner at her wedding to Joe Jonas (second left) in Las Vegas last week.                                                      Photograph: TMZ/MEGA
By: Leah Harper/UK Guardian

 

When Game of Thrones actress Sophie Turner married musician Joe Jonas in Las Vegas last week, she wore a pair of white, wide-leg trousers – and she’s not the first to ditch a traditional wedding dress for trousers or a jumpsuit.

Last week, British Vogue’s “ultimate modern bridal edit” featured three trouser options. And a report issued by fashion search engine Lyst earlier this spring said that online searches for white suits had increased by 43% over the previous three months.

On the high street, the latest wedding collection from Whistles features a wedding trouser suit as well as a cropped-leg lace jumpsuit, while Asos has a sequin-and-beaded trouser suit, two strappy jumpsuits, and trousers in its women’s bridal range.

On the catwalk, AF Vandevorst’s spring/summer ’19 collection included several bridal outfits, including satin trousers paired with wedding veils. Viktor & Rolf had a white, strapless jumpsuit as one of its 17 bridal looks, while Tadashi Shoji featured long-sleeve bridal jumpsuits in both white and pink.

“We’ve noticed a growing demand for less-traditional bridal outfits such as jumpsuits and separates,” said Amandine Ohayon, CEO of bridal brand Pronovias. “Nowadays, jumpsuits or two-pieces can have the same wow factor as a dress and can also be combined with trains, capes or gloves to provide a genuine bridal feel.”

Swapping a wedding dress for trousers or a jumpsuit is a trend that is emerging predominantly within western cultures, and particularly Christian, Catholic or non-religious ceremonies (trousers have long been part of traditional bridalwear elsewhere). In the UK, the rise in the popularity of wedding trousers coincides with the rise of registry office ceremonies, where brides are more likely to experiment with their look. Less than a quarter (24%) of all marriages were religious ceremonies in 2016 – the lowest figure ever.

More brides are now wearing several outfits over the course of their wedding day (about 23% of brides opt for more than one wedding look, according to Lyst), and there has been a rise in the number of weddings that take place over several days.

“Some brides choose a jumpsuit and a dress, so they can have the best of both worlds,” said Ohayon. “Something more traditional for the ceremony and a jumpsuit to dance the night away.”

Bridal designer Romona Keveža, who is best-known for dressing celebrities including Taylor Swift, Ariana Grande and Lady Gaga, has her UK flagship at The Wedding Gallery in London and included two jumpsuits in her fall 2018 collection. “I love the idea of a jumpsuit for a reception look, or even a civil ceremony or island wedding,” she said.

For some, of course, wedding trousers and jumpsuits may also be a small way to break with convention, while still taking part in this most traditional of ceremonies.

“They are a modern style statement for brides who want to surprise and stand out,” said Ohayon. “[Trousers and jumpsuits] may be a little more individual, while still being glamorous, stylish and aisle-worthy.”

Bridal trends
1900s

Corseted bodices with high ruffle necks and puffy sleeves. Trains and gloves are worn long.

1910s

With dancing at weddings fashionable, gowns are long but looser and easier to move in.

1920s

Flapper fashion seeps in, with dropped waists, lower necklines and higher hemlines.

1930s

The Depression, so silk is out, affordable rayon in. Figure-hugging styles more common.

JFK and Jackie Kennedy at their weddingA scene from the Kennedy-Bouvier wedding. Groom John walks alongside his bride Jacqueline at an outdoor reception, 1953. Newport, Rhode Island. (Photo by Bachrach/Getty Images)

1940s

Rationing means dress suits or Sunday best but, for those wanting a dress, long sleeves and flowing trains are in.

1950s

Tea-length dresses and sweetheart necklines, alongside lace, gloves and full skirts.

1960s

Empire-line silhouettes and mini-dress styles. High necklines, mutton sleeves and gloves also feature.

1970s

Bohemian fashion, with bell sleeves as well as hats and chokers. Skirt suits also return.

29th July 1981: Charles, Prince of Wales, with Princess Diana, on the altar of St Paul’s Cathedral during their marriage ceremony.

1980s

Puffed sleeves, long dresses and cathedral trains. Frilly hemlines and lace cuffs accompanied by oversized bouquets.

1990s

Streamlined silhouettes and minimalist dresses, a paired-back styles with little embellishment.

2000s

Gloves are out, strapless gowns in. Destination weddings become more popular, calling for dresses which “travel well”.

2010s

Mermaid silhouettes, “nude” designs and long sleeves gain early popularity, before brides branch out into jumpsuits and trouser styles.

Advertisements

Published by CityFella

Big city fella, Born and Raised in the San Francisco Bay Area. Lived in New York (a part time New Yorker) for three years . I have lived in the Sacramento area since 1993. When I first moved here, I hated it. Initially found the city too conservative for my tastes. A great place to raise children however too few options for adults . The city has grown up, there is much to do here. The city suffers from low self esteem in my opinion, locals have few positive words to say about their hometown. visitors and transplants are amazed at what they find here. From, the grand old homes in Alkali Flats, and the huge trees in midtown, there are many surprises in Sacramento. Theater is alive is this area . And finally ,there is a nightlife... In.downtown midtown, for the young and not so young. My Criticism is with local government. There is a shortage of visionaries in city hall. Sacramento has long relied on the state, feds and real estate for revenue. Like many cities in America,Downtown Sacramento was the hub of activity in the area. as the population moved to the suburbs and retail followed. The city has spent millions to revive downtown. Today less than ten thousand people live downtown. No one at city hall could connect the dots. Population-Retail. Business says Sacramento is challenging and many corporations have chosen to set up operations outside the cities limits. There is vision in the burbs. Sacramento has bones, there are many good pieces here, leaders seem unable or unwilling to put those pieces together into. Rant aside, I love it here. From the trees to the rivers. But its the people here that move me. Sacramento is one of the most integrated cities in America. I find I'm welcome everywhere. The spices work in this city of nearly 500,000 and for the most part these spices blend well together. From Ukrainians to Hispanics and a sizable gay community, all the spices seem to work well here. I frequently travel and occasionally I will venture into a city with huge racial borders, where its unsafe to visit after certain hours. I haven't found it here. I cant imagine living in a community where there is one hue or one spice. I love the big trees, Temple Coffee House, the Alhambra Safeway, Zelda's Pizza, Bicyclist in Midtown, The Mother Lode Saloon, Crest Theater, and the Rivers. I could go on and I might. Sacramento is home.

%d bloggers like this: