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The Devil’s Messenger


Sarah Huckabee Sanders

 

The White House press secretary, Sarah Huckabee Sanders, said it didn’t matter whether the anti-Muslim videos President Donald Trump retweeted on Wednesday morning were real.

These his retweets were widely condemned in the US but especially in Britain

Britain’s Prime Minister Teresa May condemned Trump, staying he was “wrong” to share videos by a group that “seeks to divide communities through their use of hateful narratives which peddle lies and stoke tensions.”

Trump in a tweet response .@Theresa_May, don’t focus on me, focus on the destructive Radical Islamic Terrorism that is taking place within the United Kingdom. We are doing just fine!

Some 1.8 million people in Britain have already signed a petition urging the government to rescind the invitation May made to Trump just weeks after his inauguration last January.
State visits are typically characterized by pomp and ceremony, and generally include a banquet with the Queen but one by Trump is unlikely to prove popular in Britain.
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Wife spills all the tea after 62 yo Hubby ditched her for 19 year old


John Copsey has ditched his wife Jacqui, 63, for 19-year-old Daisy Tomlinson (pictured, the pair together)
John Copsey was once the Conservative mayor of Bridlington, UK .  After over 30 years of marriage to his wife Jacqui he left her for his 19 year old mistress.  The two share a flat and he tells friends its the real thing and he wants to get married. 
The current Mrs Copsey said the saga has been a nightmare and that she feels they are a laughing stock and she spills the tea to the Daily Mail.
Daisy Tomlinson is 43 years younger than former mayor John Copsey.

 

John and Jacqui Copsey had been through a lot together. Their connection weathered jealously, divorce, children, an election and even a brain tumor. While it seemed like the couple who had drifted apart and found each other later in life were built to last, all it took was a pretty 19-year-old girl to tear them apart.

Charismatic, outgoing and larger than life, the electrical engineer with a passion for local politics was a popular choice in the East Yorkshire seaside town.

And John, looking distinguished in his mayoral robes and chains, took to civic duty like a duck to water. He never missed an official function, even though Jacqui, 63, was often too ill to join him as mayoress after treatment for a brain tumour.

A tireless charity-fundraiser, John, 62, let people try on his mayoral chains for a £1 donation to the local air ambulance and was a natural in front of the cameras.

John in mayoral robes and Jacqui as mayoress in 2015

John and Jacqui 2015

He and Jacqui, who first got together 38 years ago, were respected VIPs and regulars at the local yacht club and have a 34-year-old son who is first officer on luxury boat charters.

Jacqui was so proud of John. But not any more: today, she is devastated, humiliated and betrayed.

The whole town was scandalized when it emerged the former mayor had ‘ditched’ Jacqui for 19-year-old agricultural student Daisy Tomlinson — a young woman 43 years his junior.

It’s one thing to have to deal with your husband trading you in for a younger model, but another thing altogether when it’s for someone who’s young enough to be your granddaughter.

Splashed all over the papers were photographs of the new couple out and about, hand-in-hand, looking less — it must be said — like lovebirds than a teenager taking her doddery grandad out for the day.

‘I think he’s gone completely nuts,’ says Jacqui, still in shock by the sudden and tawdry end to her partnership with John.

‘He must have gone mad, because I can’t find any other way to explain it. He’s too old for a mid-life crisis.’

For Jacqui, the whole saga has been nothing short of a ‘nightmare’. She says she feels like a ‘laughing stock’ every time she leaves the house.

The love-struck pair, however, remain defiant.

Now sharing a flat with his teenage lover, Mr Copsey said after the scandal broke: ‘We are very much in love and intend to marry. You can put that down as our official engagement. There is nothing more to it.’

Daisy added: ‘We are very happy. We are at a loss why anyone is interested. It’s quite boring. My parents are happy. They say they are happy as long as I am happy.’

Mr Copsey, who met Daisy at a rock concert when she was only 17, insisted their friendship turned to romance only recently, adding that there was ‘no abuse of position’.

But in her first interview, wife Jacqui claims Daisy admitted she and John had been seeing each other once a week for the past two years.

Furthermore, Jacqui denies being ‘ditched’, saying that she kicked John out of the marital home last month after her attempts to reason with the star-crossed lovers fell on deaf ears.

When contacted by the Daily Mail, Mr Copsey  who though no longer mayor is still a town councilor said he had no further comment to make either on his relationship with Daisy or on anything his ex-wife has to say.

‘At first, I thought it was just a foolish schoolgirl crush which would fizzle out with time,’ says Jacqui, who now faces having to sell their jointly owned £235,000 three-bedroom home in a painful division of assets.

‘I don’t know how many times I said to John: “She’s only 19!” I thought he’d come to his senses and realize he was being a silly old fool, flattered by the attention.

‘John was a very good mayor and someone in his position shouldn’t have given her the time of day. It’s just crazy.

‘I can’t even begin to understand what she sees in him. I asked him: “What do you speak about? What do you have in common?” He just told me: “Oh, we get on very well.”

‘Perhaps it’s because she’ll just listen to him and not question anything, whereas I don’t. Or it’s the sex and his brain is in his crotch. I just don’t know.’

Jacqui says the couple’s son is horrified at his father’s behavior.

‘He says that even he, at 34, wouldn’t entertain going out with a 19-year-old,’ she says.

‘Even Daisy’s mother, at 49, is too young for John. The whole thing is ridiculous.’

Married in 1980, seven months after meeting in a nightclub, Jacqui admits her relationship with John has not been without problems.

In 1992, following a series of rows over what Jacqui calls John’s roving eye, they divorced. She claims he has always been ‘a ladies’ man’ and a ‘bit of a player’.

Nevertheless, in 1997 they reconciled after John’s second marriage broke down and Jacqui split from her policeman boyfriend. She says they had both realised they still loved each other.

The couple never got round to remarrying, although weddings were booked twice, but they had lived as man and wife ever since.

‘We just kind of drifted back together,’ says Jacqui. ‘We had a son, who was still a teenager, and I was feeling vulnerable after the death of my father from cancer. Our marital home was still in joint names. John was tall, good-looking and — despite being full of himself — a lively man to be with.

‘I thought it was better second time round, but now I think I was deluded and blinkered. I wish we’d never got back together.’

In 2011, shortly after John was elected to Bridlington council, Jacqui had an MRI scan to investigate loss of hearing and night-time seizures, and was shocked to be told she had a brain tumor.

John was so upset when I phoned him with the news,’ she recalls. ‘He had to pull over in the car he was crying so much.’

John was with her when she underwent radiotherapy in Sheffield to successfully treat the 2cm tumour, but the after-effects continue to this day.

Ever since, she’s suffered seizures, dizziness, tinnitus and extreme fatigue, forcing her to retire from nursing through ill-health.

John was elected deputy mayor in 2014, but Jacqui found herself unable to fully support him in his civic duties.

‘I remember John telling me after I was diagnosed with the brain tumour: “Don’t worry, Jacqui, I will stand by you,”’ she says. In 2015, three weeks before John was elected mayor, Jacqui collapsed at home following a massive seizure.

It was their son, who was home at the time, who called the ambulance.

‘I was so poorly, I was like someone with Alzheimer’s for a couple of weeks,’ she recalls.

‘I was on anti-epileptic drugs, which I shall be on for life, and steroids to reduce inflammation. The steroids caused me to put on three stone — not that I was bothered what I looked like — and my head felt full of polystyrene, but during that time John never dropped one civic engagement.’

Jacqui blames her illness for not noticing the warning signs sooner.

She says she knew Daisy only as a local teenager who belonged to a troupe of amateur performing artists, dressing up as trolls and wearing grotesque masks to entertain crowds at civic events and lark around for the cameras.

So no alarm registered when last year she saw a photograph of Daisy — minus her troll mask — posted on Facebook, showing her wearing John’s mayoral chains, with the caption: ‘Decided being mayor is not for me — I’m sticking to farming.’

‘One day John told me: “Oh, Daisy came up to me in the street and pinched my bum while I was talking to a gentleman.” And I replied: “Aren’t you the lucky one to have such a young admirer?”

‘I thought her a funny little thing, quite plain and nondescript, and I made a joke of it, because why on earth would such a young girl be interested in someone of John’s age? Later, at a civic lunch, I teased him and told everyone, “Oh John’s got a follower called Daisy” — and they started singing the song “Daisy, Daisy, give me your answer do, I’m half crazy over the love of you”.

 

‘John laughed it off and said: “I don’t know about Daisy, but you’re all crazy!”’

At a Dickensian festival at Christmas, Jacqui made a rare appearance with John and happily chatted with Daisy, telling the teenager she’d been poorly lately, but was feeling better.

But Jacqui’s suspicions were raised when, on Christmas Eve, John’s mobile phone kept ringing with calls from the teenager.

‘John told me Daisy just wanted some electrical advice because her grandad had been trying to fix their kettle and she was worried,’ says Jacqui.

‘I thought then it was a bit strange and wondered if she had a schoolgirl crush. Maybe that’s what it was in the beginning, but John should have had the control and decency not to follow it.’

Jacqui believed Daisy’s infatuation would quickly fizzle out if she ignored it, and claims John assured her that he, too, regarded it as a bit of a nuisance.

‘He told me Daisy was just a silly girl who wouldn’t leave him alone,’ she says. ‘He said he wished he’d never set eyes on her and was giving her the brush-off — and, more fool me, I believed him.’

But this year Jacqui found out John and Daisy had been on dates and had enjoyed a picnic together.

She then received a message — sent from a fake Facebook account — informing her that the pair were seeing each other behind her back.

There followed tears, rows, accusations and denials, so Jacqui decided to contact Daisy to ask what was going on.

‘I tried to reason with her, telling her: “Daisy, you’re young — your heart will soon mend. John is old enough to be your grandfather,”’ Jacqui says.

‘I thought maybe she was looking for a father figure, but she insisted that wasn’t the case.

‘She said that she was in love with John and he with her. I couldn’t believe it.

Daisy (pictured) said she was 'very happy' with Mr Copsey and that her parents were 'happy' with her relationship

Daisy (pictured) said she was ‘very happy’ with Mr Copsey and that her parents were ‘happy’ with her relationship

‘She told me: “I have messages that prove John told me he loved me and wants to be with me. I know I shouldn’t have got involved with him, but I fell in love with him deeply.”’

Jacqui opens her laptop and reads — in a flat, beaten voice — the text messages she says Daisy forwarded to her as proof of John’s love for her.

In one, John apparently tells Daisy he wants her to have his baby. He calls her his one love, his possession, his dream and — reassuring her she is not just a bit on the side — his future wife.

‘When I confronted John, he told me the text messages must have been doctored,’ says Jacqui. ‘I believed him at first, but I don’t see how they could have been.

‘I felt so hurt and angry, but I’m not a nasty person and I gave them both more leeway than I should have because Daisy was so young and naive.

‘I gave John chance after chance to end it, and he kept insisting that he had or that he was trying to.

‘He told me: “I’ve told her all sorts to put her off.” But, in the end, he just couldn’t do it — or he didn’t want to.’

Matters came to a head on Friday September 8 after John and Jacqui both attended a memorial at the yacht club, where an old friend’s ashes were being scattered.

Afterwards, they went into town together to have a drink and then get a takeaway to bring home, but ran straight into Daisy.

‘I took one look at her and instinct told me that the relationship wasn’t over. “You’re still together, aren’t you?” I said — and they both said “Yes”.

‘I was very calm, but the next morning I thought, “That’s it, Jacqui, enough is enough”, and chucked him out.

‘John moved into lodgings first, and then he and Daisy got a flat together.’

Today, relations remain strained, to say the least. Jacqui reckons it is only a matter of time before Daisy tires of her elderly fiance, and she says she wouldn’t be surprised if John asked if he could come home.

She says he recently sent her a text message, apologizing for all the upset and adding: ‘I understand you hate my guts, but I will help you in any way, shopping, financial, whatever you need.’

‘I do miss him and I don’t like being on my own, but I’d be a complete idiot to have him back,’ she says. ‘I can’t humiliate myself further.

‘I gave him all those chances. He didn’t have to do this.

‘I’d be unhappy if Daisy was 50 or 60, but the fact she’s only 19 makes it so horrible. She’s so young, and he’s old enough to know better.

‘It makes me wonder if John ever really loved me, or if he knows anything about love at all.’

 

From Daily Mail/UK

REVENGE “Forklift Style” (video)


 

 

Birmingham, UK

A mean thoughtless person parked their Toyota Yaris in front of a garage entrance preventing  workers access to the building.

Frustrated, two employees took matters into their own hands. Before the owner arrived they picked up the small hatchback with a forklift and very neatly placed it in a space across the street.

 

 

 

 

How gay Chinese hide their relationships behind ‘sham marriages’


In China – where same-sex unions are not legal and homosexuality remains taboo – gay men and women are marrying each other

When Xiaoxiong and her lesbian lover wanted to hide their relationship from their parents, they decided to find men willing to marry them. They had a specific type in mind: gay.

Searching out suitors for such a marriage of convenience proved difficult, so she created an online matchmaking forum to help others like her conform with family and societal pressures in China, where same-sex marriage is not legal and homosexuality remains taboo.

“I was so relieved that there was a way to please my parents without getting trapped in a marriage with some poor straight man,” said Xiaoxiong, self-described tomboy, who did not want to give her surname to protect her privacy.

“Some of us wish we could trick ourselves, too,” the 35-year-old added.

She lives with her partner, Xiaojing, 36, their dog and two cats in Shenyang, the capital of northeastern Liaoning province, one of China’s more conservative regions.

But during holidays and special occasions, they separate to be with their husbands and families, pretending to be traditional wives.

In China being openly gay is still fraught with difficulties. Dressing a certain way or public displays of affection can draw stares and lead to family turmoil.

Some Chinese parents have even brought gay children to “conversion” clinics for treatment.

Homosexuality was classified as a mental illness in China until 2001 and a crime until 1997, and authorities have arrested gay rights activists.

Around 90 per cent of 20 million gay men in China are married to women who are usually straight and do not initially know their husband’s real sexual orientation, according to a 2012 study from Qingdao University. The study did not look at lesbians’ behavior.

But gay men and women are increasingly marrying each other in so-called cooperative marriages.

There are no estimates on the number of gay-lesbian marriages, but several websites dedicated to them have popped up in recent years.

The largest one, Chinagayles.com, says it has amassed more than 400,000 users and facilitated more than 50,000 cooperative marriages in the past 12 years.

Homophobia in China

“When I turned 25, my parents started to really pressure me to get married. So I searched the internet for ideas,” Xiaoxiong said.

She started her own forum on the popular QQ social media platform to help gays like herself find the ideal fake spouse in northeast China.

Some of the men she spoke with had unrealistic expectations, such as wanting her to grow out her buzz cut or move to a different city to live in the same house as in-laws.

In 2012, she married a high school maths teacher 10 years her senior whose laid-back demeanour immediately made her feel comfortable.

But she cringes at the wedding photos of herself in a white gown and curly black wig. The video makes her “want to vomit”, she concedes.

Within weeks of the ceremony, Xiaojing, her partner for eight years, had also wed a gay man.

The two women run a traditional Chinese medical practice together, and they dedicate several hours each week to answering questions on the online matchmaking forum.

But Xiaojing warns people interested in cooperative marriages to be prepared for potential complications.

“Some people rush into a marriage with someone they barely know,” she said. “But just like real marriage, it only works between people who agree on important things like where to live and whether to have children, and who genuinely care about each other.”

But some gay rights activists frown upon such arrangements.

“By pretending to be straight and enjoying the social benefits, they are abandoning other LGBT people to face the pressure alone,” said Ah Qiang, a prominent activist who leads China’s PFLAG group – Parents, Families and Friends of Lesbians and Gays.

“I think a reason homophobia is still so strong in China is that many straight people don’t know any openly gay people,” he said.

Xiaoxiong and Xiaojing believe their families likely know the truth about their relationship, but nobody wants to acknowledge the obvious.

“We don’t wish for much,” Xiaoxiong said. “When we are home, when we are sitting side by side, we just feel so peaceful and happy.”

South China Morning Post

A surprising number of adults are still scared of the dark and check for monsters under their bed


A shocking 64 per cent admit to still being scared of the dark in a new poll (Image: Getty)

According to a new poll, 17% sleep with a light on while 18% jump into bed with their kids if they’re too scared to sleep alone. A staggering 64% of British adults admit they are still scared of the dark, according to a new study.

Researchers discovered that nearly two thirds of the nation dislike putting the lights out at bedtime, while 36% regularly get the feeling someone or something is in the room with them.

As many as one in five (20%) of the 2,000 adults polled by sleep experts Bensons for Beds said they regularly check under the bed for lurking monsters and close cupboard and wardrobe doors before they get into bed.

Nearly two thirds hate putting the lights out at bedtime (Image: Getty)

A further 17% sleep with a light on most nights of the week.

The new poll comes days after a  John Lewis Christmas Advertisement which sees loveable Moz the Monster befriend little boy Joe after he sets up home under his bed.

But according to Bensons’ research, not everyone is expecting a friendly monster – as the average adult wakes up at least twice a month feeling scared that something creepy and untoward is hiding in the room.

One in five admitted to checking their beds, cupboards and wardrobes before bed (Image: Getty)

Almost half (48%) said they have an overactive imagination, which leads to them feeling scared and frightened of the smallest sounds and noises.

In fact, 22% of the nation confessed they do not like to poke their foot out from underneath the duvet in case something grabs it, while a quarter of adults believe they have seen a mysterious shadow in their bedroom.

WATCH THE 2017 JOHN LEWIS CHRISTMAS ADVERT IN FULL

The survey showed 18% of parents have even hopped into bed with their children as they were too scared to sleep alone.

In fact, women are the most likely to suffer, with 53% of women saying they are scared to be in the house alone compared to 25% of men.

Henry Swift, Chief Customer Officer at Bensons for Beds said: “This research highlights that some of the fears and insecurities we have as children, stay with us well until adulthood.

“Whilst it’s sensible to double and triple check doors and windows are locked securely, there is probably little need to check the wardrobe or under the bed for monsters, but at some point we have all felt nervous during the night when we hear a floorboard creak or can’t make out a shadow clearly.

36% regularly get the feeling someone or something is in the room with them (Image: Getty)
When it comes to worrying about things that go bump in the night, the most common time for adults to become alarmed is 2:30am.

Four in ten adults regularly peer out from behind the bedroom curtains to check no one is lurking outside – however there is safety in numbers as one in five adults even drag their other half to the toilet with them if they have to spend a penny during the night.

Australia says YES to same-sex marriage


Marriage equality could be legal by Christmas after 61.6% of participants in the voluntary survey approve a change to the law

Marriage equality advocates in Melbourne celebrate as the result of the postal survey is announced.

Marriage equality advocates in Melbourne celebrate as the result of the postal survey is announced. Photograph: Scott Barbour/Getty Images

By: Paul Karp/UK Guardian

Australia has taken a decisive step towards legislating marriage equality by Christmas after 61.6% of voters in an unprecedented national postal survey approved a change to the law to allow couples of the same sex to marry.

With a turnout of 79.5% the result in the voluntary survey is considered a highly credible reflection of Australian opinion and gives marriage equality advocates enormous momentum to achieve the historic social reform. Australia’s chief statistician, David Kalisch, announced the results at a press conference in Canberra at 10am on Wednesday, revealing 7,817,247 people voted in favour and 4,873,987 voted against.

At a press conference in Canberra, Turnbull said that Australians had “spoken in their millions and they have voted overwhelmingly yes for marriage equality”.

Turnbull said the result was “unequivocal and overwhelming”, implicitly warning conservatives including in his own government that the public are “our masters” and the parliament must now deliver on the result.

“They voted yes for fairness, yes for commitment, yes for love. And now it is up to us here in the parliament of Australia to get on with it, to get on with the job the Australian people asked us to do and get this done,” he said, stressing the law should change before Christmas.

At a rally in Melbourne, the Labor leader, Bill Shorten, said: “What a fabulous day to be an Australian – because in this survey the Australian people have declared overwhelmingly Australia is ready for marriage equality.

“And I just want to make one promise: today we celebrate, tomorrow we legislate,” he said.

Bill Shorten celebrates the results of the same-sex marriage postal survey in Melbourne.
 Bill Shorten celebrates the results of the same-sex marriage postal survey in Melbourne. Photograph: Scott Barbour/Getty Images

Turnbull, same-sex marriage supporters in Australia’s ruling Liberal-National party Coalition, the Labor opposition, Greens and other cross-bench parties have reached a consensus around a cross-party bill that makes minimalist changes to protect religious freedom without legalizing discrimination by commercial service providers, such as cake makers, as some conservatives in the Coalition government have demanded.

Appearing alongside Turnbull, the finance minister, Mathias Cormann, said the cross-party bill was a “good starting point” but he believed “there is a need for some additional religious protections”, signalling amendments could still be contentious within the government.

The bill will be introduced in to the Senate on Wednesday for debate on Thursday and Shorten has offered the opposition’s support to help “stare down the conservatives seeking to delay marriage equality”.

A bill is expected to pass, with many opponents of marriage equality in parliament promising to respect the result, although parliament may consider amendments. Coalition parliamentarians, who were previously required to vote against marriage equality will now be given a free vote, Labor MPs are almost universally in favour and a majority of crossbenchers will also support the bill.

On Tuesday, Turnbull said the government “would not countenance”legalizing discrimination against same-sex weddings by commercial service providers and warned a rival conservative bill to do so would have “virtually no prospect” of passing parliament.

In a speech after the result Equality Campaign spokesman, Alex Greenwich, said: “Today love has had a landslide victory.”

“Together we have achieved something truly remarkable, a win for fairness and equality, not only for the LGBTI community and our families, but for all Australians,” he said.

Greenwich said the campaign had made more than 1 million  phone calls and knocked 100,000 doors, an “unprecedented” level of support that had exceeded “any campaign in our history”.

“In doing so it has delivered an unequivocal mandate to federal parliament to vote this through by the end of the year.”

With the positive result, Turnbull, a supporter of same-sex marriage leading a party that straddles both liberal and conservative traditions, looks to have finally achieved a win against reactionaries in his party that oppose the social reform.

https://interactive.guim.co.uk/charts/embed/nov/2017-11-15T00:54:29/embed.html

Some conservatives have suggested they will put forward their marriage bill in the Coalition party room in two weeks, but senior ministers including Cormann have protected the prime minister’s position by insisting the parliament will choose which bill and amendments to allow.

Same-sex marriage has been banned in Australia since 2004 when the Howard government changed the Marriage Act to define marriage as between a man and a woman. As many comparable countries such as the US and Britain allowed or legislated for same-sex marriage, Australia looked increasingly out of step. After the successful marriage equality referendum in Ireland in May 2015, pressure grew on the Australian government to legislate but the Coalition party room agreed on a national plebiscite instead, although there was no legal requirement to do so.

A crowd celebrates the results of the postal survey in front of the State Library of Victoria Wednesday.
 A crowd celebrates the results of the postal survey in front of the State Library of Victoria Wednesday. Photograph: Scott Barbour/Getty Images

When Turnbull took the prime ministership from conservative predecessor Tony Abbott. In September 2015, he retained the Coalition’s commitment to hold a national plebiscite on same-sex marriage before changing the law.

Labor, the Greens and other opposition parties blocked the proposed plebiscite in the Senate in November 2016 and August 2017, leading the Turnbull government to launch a $122 million voluntary national postal survey to fulfill its election commitment to give Australians a say.

In a bruising three-month campaign, opponents of marriage equality including the Australian Christian Lobby, and the Catholic and Anglican churches in Sydney, claimed same-sex marriage would have far reaching negative consequences for gender education. Former prime ministers Tony Abbott and John Howard warned that religious freedom and freedom of speech were at risk.

The yes camp’s Equality Campaign combined with moderate Liberals, Labor, the Greens, unions and progressive campaign organisation Get Up to argue that same-sex marriage was a matter of equality and fairness.

The campaign featured everyday Australians, their friends and families, emphasising that the only question was whether LGBTI Australians should be able to marry the one they love.

Despite assertions from Turnbull that the survey would be overwhelmingly respectful , the campaign has been marred by homophobic incidents and campaign material which continued largely unabated despite a special law passed to apply electoral law safeguards to the survey, such as authorization requirements for campaign materials.

The campaign also featured two unsuccessful high court challenges against the expenditure of $122m for the survey, as marriage equality advocates fought to prevent the poll seen as an affront because it determined LGBTI people’s equality before the law by a majoritarian vote.

Public polling throughout the campaign showed consistent support for marriage equality and weekly estimates showed the survey was on-track for a record turnout.

The no campaign took increasingly bizarre turns, with Abbott using an assault that even his attacker said had nothing to do with marriage to rally Australians to his cause, and conservatives attempting to use rapper Macklemore’s performance of his hit Same Love at the rugby league grand final to claim the national campaign they called for had inappropriately politicized Australian institutions.

The cross-party bill will be debated in the Senate on Thursday and the parliamentary sitting week beginning 27 November, with supporters of marriage equality aiming to pass a bill through both houses of parliament before they rise on 7 December.

como estas


Image result for como estas

I’m a Californian, lived here most of my life.  I’ve had Mexican/Latin friends all of my life

Roommates, housemates, friendships, spanning decades. Our families are interchangeable.   Recently, returning from LA , I called a friend to tell him I was planning to visit his family in Tulare on my way home.  After, I arrived, he told me, his abuela, who is in her nineties cooked throughout the night for my visit.  I still have her delicacies in my freezer.

I met Roberto, my first year of school in Fresno.  I struggled the first few months on my own.  With the exception of my mother in the Bay Area, no one knew of my dire situation.  The only food on my shelves was spaghetti, no meat, no sauce, just pasta and salt until my next pay check.

His family lived in Corcoran, a small city in Kings County.  On my first visit, everyone in his very large family was warm except for the old lady in the green chair (his abuela) I later discovered I was the families first black visitor and abuela didn’t trust black people.

Returning home, they loaded up the back of his truck with boxes of food for him.  I  remember being envious and wishing the food was for me.   When we arrived at my apartment, he said the food WAS for me.  Five boxes of food with cans of soda.  Somehow they knew.  We carried the boxes of food to my door,  I was so ashamed  I wouldn’t let him in my bleak apartment with a small black and white TV and a mattress on the floor.

Through the years my family has become more latin, english is their second language .

Despite my exposure to Spanish, my Spanish sucks.  Some,members of my family, go out of their way to make fun of me.  “I know you know this, say it!  and I do know it, dammit!  but I get it wrong.   Of course they love this.  This winter, I plan to take a few of them, to an isolated area in the mountains, where some of them may be discovered after the spring thaw .

 I can speak 30 words with confidence. I understand about 100 words.  Many friends assume I’m fluent.  Of course, this is usually after they’ve had a few drinks.

Through the years I have purchased, cassettes, books, Cd’s to increase my knowledge of the language, most are unopened.  I only remember the books then is when I’m visiting friends and family.    When it comes to como esta , I’m VERY CONFIDENT!  ‘bien, muy bien.   

WINNING!!!   

If you need an enthusiastic spanish speaking greeter  I’m your man!   I’m friendly!  Buenos días.  Buenas tardes, Buena noches ,adios with a big smile, beyond that it’s uh huh!  

CityFella

 

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