The salt-and-pepper pound: where are all the fiftysomething models?


73-year-old Lauren Hutton modelling for Calvin Klein in April. Photograph: Calvin Klein

When I first started blogging as That’s Not My Age nine years ago, I was always banging on about the lack of older models, my Grey-dar permanently on high alert. But whereas in the past, the older model was restricted to a healthcare or life insurance gig (cue woman strolling jauntily down the beach in a lilac waterfall cardigan and stretch chinos), now nearly every week there’s another gorgeous silver-haired model in an advertisement for a fashion brand. While this age-appreciation is fantastic – it is wonderful to see women such as Daphne Selfe, 88, Maye Musk, 69, and Lauren Hutton, 73, looking vivacious and stunning, I still can’t help wondering: where have all the fiftysomething models gone?

 

Maye Musk (69) at the CFDA Fashion Awards, New York, this month. Photograph: Neil Rasmus/BFA/REX/Shutterstock

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Although the fashion industry has finally woken up to the power of the Silver Spend (in the UK, the 50+ customer accounts for 47% of consumer spending), advertisers appear to have resorted to a kind of “diversity checklist”. Model with grey hair: tick. That’s age sorted then. But the view of the older woman we’re being shown is signified by someone in her 60s, 70s, or beyond. It’s lazy; it creates an age gap and we still end up with extremes. Young and sexy or old and fetishised – take your pick.

 

Click the link below for the full story

 

https://www.theguardian.com/fashion/2017/jun/08/the-salt-and-pepper-pound-where-are-all-the-fiftysomething-models#img-1

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Death threats and angry chefs – when restaurant reviews go wrong


Eating nice food for a living sounds great, but there are downsides: from being unmasked to finding out, after you’ve published a glowing review, that there were rodents in the kitchen. The UK’s top critics spill the beans

‘The rat droppings were exquisitely cooked’ ... CheeMc restaurant, which didn’t quite live up to Jay Rayner’s billing.

‘The rat droppings were exquisitely cooked’ … CheeMc restaurant, which didn’t quite live up to Jay Rayner’s billing. Photograph: Richard Saker for the Observer

By: Alexi Duggins/UK Guardian

Being paid to eat is a pretty good gig, but it isn’t without problems. There are restaurants that try to hoodwink you, angry chefs to contend with and, as the Observer’s Jay Rayner found out recently, always the possibility that a place you have raved about may have kitchens that are not entirely rodent-free. (A south London Korean restaurant he loved was temporarily closed after rat droppings were found among the ingredients.) We spoke to some of Britain’s top restaurant critics to find out about the trickier parts of the trade.

Restaurateurs can get very angry

Fay Maschler, Evening Standard

In the 40-odd years I have been reviewing, I’ve had a few angry reactions from restaurants – more so when I started. Back then, it was unusual to be critical, as a lot of restaurant reviews were linked to the advertisements – someone eating for free and then saying things such as: “My companion plumped for the pâté, washing it down with the eminently quaffable house wine …” So when I didn’t have to satisfy advertisers, my reviews could upset people used to the old system. There was this guy who was running a pretentious, bogus French restaurant who just couldn’t believe I would come to his restaurant and criticise anything. I had to go back with the features editor, where in an empty dining room we ate another deeply mediocre meal, this time accompanied by a string trio. I had a death threat once, a note scribbled in pencil that said: “I am going to come round and stab you.” Now so many people review restaurants that I tend to get fewer hostile responses. Tom Sellers recently wrote a public letter criticising me and my review of his restaurant Ours. I didn’t pay it much attention. I got some nice messages of solidarity from others in the business – and I wasn’t alone in not liking it. For the most part it is a lovely job being a restaurant critic. To complain would be churlish.”

The inscrutability of food hygiene

Jay Rayner, The Observer

“I have form for recommending restaurants that are then shut down for health and safety reasons. CheeMc on Walworth Road, south London, is the latest (although it has now reopened), but it’s the third time it has happened in my memory – the other two being Sichuanese places. I love those scuzzy, down-at-heel restaurants because they tend to get by on trade from a specific ethnic group, which means that their food can be very uncompromising. It’s cooking with hobnailed boots on – this is food that leaves its mark on you. But there really is no way to know what the hygiene is like in the kitchen. It’s not my job to check their health and safety, so I work on the basis that if a restaurant is trading then it’s already passed all those rules. Admittedly, health and safety is a function of price. When you pay for your expensive linguine dish at the Ivy, you’re also paying for the eight kitchen porters whose entire job is to keep the kitchens clean. When you pay buttons for fried chicken at a small establishment, you’re not. But plenty of places are fine and reports of hygiene problems in the odd one don’t make me think that I’m an idiot for ever having gone there. Personally, I think it’s worth taking a risk occasionally.”

Restaurants can be unpredictable

Tania Ballantine, Time Out

Sometimes there’s just nothing you can do as a critic. Occasionally you have restaurants who will get in fantastic chefs for the first six months, because they know that that’s the period during which all the reviews are written. We had this Greek place once that we reviewed well, but then started to get bad reports about – it turned out that they had flown in this superstar chef from Greece for a few months just to get it good reviews. Other times, the restaurant can’t help it. They will hire an ambitious, talented young chef (such as when Pidgin hired Elizabeth Allen, or Pachamama hired Adam Rawson) and, just when the place really starts to get a name for itself, that chef moves on to pursue a brighter future. You can’t blame the chefs, it’s human nature. But it’s bad news for the reader, because most professional reviews will be based on when there was a different person running the kitchen – and, as a critic, it’s frustrating because you just couldn’t have foreseen that happening.

Maintaining your cover can be tricky

Marina O’Loughlin, Guardian Weekend

“I’ve got a radar now as to the rare occasions that I think I’ve been clocked. But not always: I met a famous restaurateur while out on the lash. My way more famous restaurant critic friend introduced me as Maureen from Glasgow then staggered off to the loo, leaving me alone with the restaurateur. At first I sat in horrified silence: of course, I knew who he was. Eventually, drink got the better of me and I confessed: “R, it’s me – Marina.” He looked at me, amused, and said: “I know.” Obviously, I blame the drink. Another time, a well-known chef was in the same restaurant as me and approached my table with a triumphant: “Hello, Marina!” But it was, bizarrely, addressed to my pal. I’ve no idea how or why this happened.

Restaurant staff aren’t always kind to critics

Tim Hayward, Financial Times

Restaurants have pictures of well-known critics on the back of their kitchen doors so that the staff know who to watch out for. When I first started reviewing restaurants, no one knew who I was. I just wasn’t a big enough name to have my photograph up there yet. Then one day I got a phonecall from a friend, who had been scouting for locations for a TV programme, saying: “I’ve just seen seen your face on the back of a kitchen door.” My reaction was: “Yes! That’s fantastic! I”ve arrived!” I was very happy about it. Then she said: “Yes, but underneath it says, ‘He looks like a fat, bald Corbyn.’”

45 Sadness


He is my president, the 45th president of the United States of America.  Like many Americans I  hoped for the best and told myself I would to give him a chance.

That was January 20th

As of the February 19, I am mortified, embarrassed and sad.

Doing a reality check I asked myself, am I a sore loser, am I angry?

Disappointed yes, its one of many disappointments I’ve experienced when the best man lost.    When 43( George W) won I was dissapointed. There weren’t statements or questions in his character that led me to believe he might damage the country.

In less than 30 days, 45 has manage to damage our image. He has managed to bring the stability of the United States into question.   He has insulted our allies and caused most of us to be on constant alert. What will he do or say today?

Despite all the alternative facts, I’m not in shock.  President 45 and Candidate Trump are the same person.   I’ve never been at odds with his supporters, in fact I understand why they supported him.  While his candidacy has  awakened a racist element ,I don’t subscribe to the notion that all of his supporters are racists.  However since the election, some of my Indian, Mexican and Iranian friends have been attacked, some physically.  The citizenship of anyone with an accent is now questioned.

I find it difficult to respond, whenever one of my international friends ask why-how was he elected?  I lay of lot of the blame on my candidate, Hillary Clinton, and the other candidates,Marco Rubio, Chris Christie, Bernie Sanders, Lindsey Graham, Martin O’Malley,Carly Fiorina, John Kasich, Rick Perry and Jeb Bush.     Not one of these candidates stepped forward the day or the after he made that racist statement about Mexicans.   No one said this isn’t acceptable, he is wrong and doesn’t represent my  America!  Jeb Bush who’s wife is Mexican, their  children have relatives in Mexico was uncomfortably silent.   We have seen the careers of sportscasters and other notable individuals end, after making racists comments.  One wonders how successful he would have been if one or more of the candidates immediately spoke out against him.

The root of my sadness comes from the news.  Rarely a day passes without a  an international misstep by 45 or someone in his administration which is later blamed on the evil media. It also comes from Social Media.

There is an upside…..

People are awake!  There are daily demonstrations all over the country.   The Women’s march gave me hope.  I participated in the Muslim demonstration at Sacramento International.   One demonstration I wont participate in is “45 isnt my President”  With so many demonstrations I worry that they will eventually lose their impact.

To counter my sadness, I limit the time I spend of social media and watching the news. With so many people in shock, one thing is missing is humor. SNL has been a god send for me, through the writers I can exhale.

I’m gonna be okay, so will the rest of us.   Please don’t recommend therapy or snappy happy pills. I promise I wont throw myself in traffic or eat a case of Lil Debbie treats.  Its not that serious. I am an an optimist, today is today, and in time it will get better.

I wish more people would refer to him as 45.  The narcissist loves hearing his name and 45 would make him crazy, or are we too late.?

CityFella

Bride Takes Wedding Guests to McDonald’s Groom goes Paintballing


Antoinette Sullivan
Bride Antoinette Sullivan on her wedding day in McDonald’s

Antoinette Sullivan, 28, had spent months dieting for the big day with Miles, 23, but when pals whisked him off she decided to treat herself

By Ian Murphy/Uk Mirror

A junk food craving bride treated her guests to a McDonald’s  after her husband went on his own on their wedding day.

Antoinette Sullivan, 28, had spent months dieting to fit into her white dress for the bigf day when she tied the knot with Miles, 23, on Friday.

But she was left stunned when her new husband was ‘kidnapped’ after the ceremony and taken paintballing by his pals.

Deciding to have her own fun, she took the rest of the wedding party to the fast food restaurant in Hereford and tucked into burger and chips.

SWNSAntoinette Sullivan
Antoinette, 28 and Miles Sullivan, 23 on their wedding day on Friday

Beauty therapist Antoinette said: “When Miles went off with his mates I thought to myself, well if he can have his fun then I can I have mine.

“We laughed about it but my friends said I should have gone mad but I don’t care, it was a great day and I’d been craving junk food after months of dieting.

“It was the best burger I’d ever eaten and the best way to mark the day. It was perfect and typical of me and Miles.

“We’re best friends as well as husband and wife and we never stop each other doing what we want to do.

“He wanted to go paintballing with his mates and I wanted a burger and chips and that’s what we did.”

SWNSAntoinette Sullivan
The newlyweds with their guests at Hereford Town Hall on Friday – before Miles was whisked away

The couple, who have four children, tied the knot in a secret ceremony in front of just 15 guests in Hereford Town Hall last week.

But minutes after they said their vows Miles left his new wife to go paintballing with his pals.

Antoinette and her friends went to a nearby pub before the bride, who was still wearing her white wedding dress, strolled into the busy city cent McDonald’s.

Despite the stunned looks, she polished off a quarter pounder burger with fries and mozzarella sticks – before meeting back up with Miles for an evening bash.

SWNSAntoinette Sullivan
The couple decided to tie the knot last week but only had a few guests, including their four children

Antoinette said: “We wanted the main ceremony to be more secretive in front of just a few people, mainly kids.

“We got married at 12pm and had the photos at 12.45pm and went to a pub for a celebration drink.

“I saw Miles talking to his mates and he came across looking sheepish and said ‘the lads have organised my stag do for today’.

“At first I thought he was joking but then I just said ‘go and have fun’. To be honest I was relieved because I was starving and didn’t want some poncy wedding day anyway.

SWNSAntoinette Sullivan
The McDonalds in Hereford where the bridal party celebrated the wedding

“Me and the girls went over the road to the pub and I took the kids to McDonald’s.

“Everyone in the restaurant said congratulations. It was a lovely day and I’ve never laughed so hard in my life.

“I met up with Miles in the evening and we had a great party with our friends.

SWNSAntoinette Sullivan
Antoinette tucking into a burger and fries after dieting for months for the big day

“People spend way too much on weddings and there was no way I wanted to spend an obscene amount on something like this.

“We just wanted to do it in our own way and for ourselves. We are not traditionalists.”

Roofer Miles added: “I didn’t have a stag do because we did it all at such short notice.

“After the ceremony the boys told me they were kidnapping me to go paintballing.

SWNSAntoinette Sullivan
Herefordshire Paintball where the groom and his stags celebrated the wedding day

“I asked Antoinette first of course but she was great about it. We’re like that as a couple. I love her to bits.

“I must have the best wife in the world to let me leave her in her dress and go off on my stag do.”

The couple left for a honeymoon in Tenby in Wales but left after a day because they were bored and spent the weekend at Alton Towers.

Omarion Cancels Appearance at London Nightclub Accused of Racism.


On Oct. 2, promoters at DSTRKT announced an appearance by Omarion. However, the R&B star tweeted that he would not support the club.  The very popular west end  club has been embroiled in controversy surrounding the entry of four black women on Sep 26.

Zalika Miller said, a promoter said one of her friends was too dark and the other was too fat.

Click the Link for the full Story

https://sacratomatovillepost.com/2015/10/02/clubbin-in-london-dstrkt-is-not-your-club-if-your-too-fat-or-too-dark/

Protesters have called for black performers to boycott the venue.

Last week, Karrucehe Tran   received some backlash after she made an appearance at the club days after the women were denied. Karrueche denounced the discrimination allegations, but some were upset that she decided to party at the club.

CityFella

Clubbin in London: DSTRKT is not your club if your Too Fat or Too Dark


Zalika Miller

DSTRKT in London’s West End is the place to be if your someone like Drake or Rihanna, but if your a bit too fat or a bit too dark, this isn’t your place.  

 Last weekend, , Zalika Miller, Lin Mei, Reisha, and Tasha Campbell wanting to get their dance on headed to the trendy club at #9 Rupert Street.

When the ladies arrived at 10 pm they were told the club was full.  How so nevah other women were allowed to enter.

“Record Screech”

Needing some clarity (quick,fast and in a hurry!)

Mei said,Ugo Allessio, the manager, requested the women line up against a wall across the street so he could look them over via closed circuit TV. Several moments later, the promoter, known as Daniel, came back and said that although he thought the women were attractive, his manager disagreed. “Daniel came over to me and stated it’s because the girls are too dark,” Mei explained via email. “When I told the girls they were disgusted.”

When Mei (who is biracial) confronted Allessio for being offensive, he conceded that she and another friend could come in but the two would have to be left behind.

The Power of Social Media!

This isn’t Over!

Facebook, Instagram, the local papers, the BBC and the New York Papers, these ladies were serious.

On social media, dozens of other partygoers – including BBC Radio 1Xtra DJ Sarah-Jane Crawford – said they had experienced racist door policies at high-end clubs.

protests at DSTRKT..

 DSTRKT (no comment)

Until……….

Westminister City council, that licenses the venue, Dstrkt, said it was concerned by the allegations and said anyone who had been affected should report their complaints to the Equality and Human Rights Commission.

The management said: “DSTRKT restaurant and late night lounge has always operated an anti-racist door policy.

“It condemns any type of racism or discrimination by customer or staff.  “They said, they conducted a through investigation and at no point did staff say the women wouldn’t be allowed in on the basis of skin color or size.  “Comments made by external promoters to the women or in general have nothing to do with Dstrkt and aren’t deemed acceptable,” it said, adding that the women had been denied entry on Saturday because the club was fully booked.

They posted a statement of their Facebook page which said it has “always operated an anti-racist door policy and it condemns any type of racism or discrimination by customers or staff”.

The club posted pictures from inside the club of two of the women concerned on a previous visit, though Mei said she had never disputed that she had been allowed in the club previously.

The club’s management also said: “At least two of the women who made the complaint against DSTRKT, Lin Mei and Zalika Miller, have been allowed entry to our venue in the past as can been seen on Lin Mei’s Instagram account @linmeitalks from 12 weeks ago which showed a picture of her enjoying herself at our venue with two other friends and the message stated ‘… And again #nightout #dstrkt’.

“It appears that this message has now been deleted from her account but this clearly shows that the only reason she was turned away on the night of the 26 September was that the club was fully booked due to its popularity. ”


A Billion Years Ago

For five  days my friend Jennifer and I stood in line at New York’s Studio 54.  The people making the decision of who gets in were beyond cruel.   They would tell people they were too ugly or fat and despite these insults, most people remained in line.  It was degrading and exciting and  watching Limo’s and Rolls Royce’s pulling up to the club.  One night we saw  Mrs Bianca Jagger and Sally Kellerman enter the club. It was fun to watch pretenders step out hourly Limo’s, confidently handing the men folded hundred dollar bills and then escorted to the end of the line with date in tow.  If there was a couple they would allow one of them to go inside.   Cruel, terrible right?  Who would do that?

On a drizzling Saturday night. It was a threesome, my friend her boyfriend and me.   After 45 minutes we were near the front, we knew we weren’t getting in but at least we could see the celebrities up close.  One of the men said two of us could go in.  I assumed, they meant Jennifer and her soon to be husband .  Nope!  Before I could argue, Jennifer went in without saying anything to her stunned boyfriend or me. Then the man looked at me as if the say your going in?  I didn’t know what to do..   Ah, bye.

Not sure how are why I was let in, I was clearly the big (non celebrity) man inside.  It was wonderland, filled with beautiful people.  I danced holding in my stomach as much as I could.  The only negative was the bathrooms (co-ed) filled with nasty water and cigarettes.

We closed down the club and  went to Chock Full of Nuts Restaurant for french fries and coffee and talked the night away about our experience.   Arriving at the apartment, her boyfriend locked us out.   We rode on the subway until he went to work.   He didn’t speak to us for a few of days.

CityFella

Sources: Uk Mirror, UkGardian, undergroundgazette,

The once-mighty bromance is dead – and Get Hard killed it


The genre that started out celebrating male friendship has become a travesty of itself, as Hollywood trawls the racist, homophobic depths

By Hadley Freeman/Uk Guardian

You can actually see the moment the bromance genre, for so long one of the most reliable and lucrative of Hollywood film genres, dies – and appropriately enough, it happens in a men’s room. It’s always interesting to witness the death of a film genre. Sometimes it happens in an act of gleeful murder. In 1988 the brilliant Heathers stabbed the then ubiquitous 1980s teen film through the heart with satire, and buried it forever beneath layers of irony. Clint Eastwood did something similar with the genre that had made his name when he released Unforgiven in 1992, a revisionist western with no good guys that, instead of glory, is filled with guilt and grit.

But the more common method is for a film genre to commit self-slaughter through laziness. The most recent one to throw itself upon its sword is the bromance, and the metaphorical sword in this case is the execrable new Will Ferrell and Kevin Hart comedy, Get Hard.

Chances are you’ve already read about this film, and chances are what you’ve read is the extensive criticism it has received for its homophoic and racist script that makes the movie look at least 20 years more dated than the worst Richard Pryor 1980s comedy. The movie’s plot, which was possibly written on a piece of toilet paper in a Los Angeles private members’ club, involves a rich white dude (Ferrell) getting lessons from a poor black man (Hart) about how to be tough so he can cope when he goes to prison. I won’t risk your brain cells by quoting scenes – suffice to say that it epitomizes everything that has destroyed the bromance genre from within over the past decade. Moreover, it illustrates how bafflingly conservative Hollywood has become.

Contrary to popular belief, Judd Apatow – director of The 40-Year-Old Virgin and Knocked Up – did not invent the bromance. The bromance has actually been around for decades, from The Odd Couple to Lethal Weapon, and is just a twist on the old buddy movie, but with greater fetishisation of male friendship. So Butch Cassidy and the Sundance Kid: buddy movie. Point Break: bromance. Although it’s easy, and understandable, to dismiss this genre as junk, some of the funniest comedies Hollywood has made in recent years have been bromances: Anchorman, Zoolander, Superbad.

Heck, some of the best movies of all time have been about male friendship (specifically, Ghostbusters). But as one of my favorite film writers, the New York Times’s AO Scott, wrote last year, bromances have become “a cesspool of nervous homophobia and lazy racial stereotyping”, and few films have typified this more than Get Hard, a comedy entirely about the fear of male rape and how black and white men are essentially different species. The specific scene in which the bromance dies comes when, for reasons too stupid to elaborate, Ferrell – a gifted comedian who is fast rivaling Robert de Niro for his penchant for signing on to films that are beneath him – attempts to give another man a blow job in a men’s toilet stall, reaching towards the penis but simultaneously recoiling in disgust. It is an appropriate end for a genre that once celebrated male friendship but is now crazed with a fear of seeming gay.

To understand how this has happened, you only need look at the romcom. After the heights of the romcom in the 1980s (When Harry Met Sally) and early 1990s (Pretty Woman), the genre was overstretched and debased with utterly disposable pap (Failure to Launch, Serendipity). Studios thought they could stop worrying about things like scripts and credibility and simply stick stars such as Reese Witherspoon, Matthew McConaughey and Kate Hudson in front of the camera. The genre that once spotlit women’s love of romance ended up depicting women as deranged harpies driven gaga by wedding hunger, who were humiliated on screen, either for having jobs (The Proposal, Sweet Home Alabama), or their baffling inability to walk (Miss Congeniality – sure, she seems scary because she’s a grownup, but look! She always falls down!). By the mid-2000s, the romcom was superseded by the bromance, and exactly the same process happened again: a genre that was once aimed at a specific gender ending up reducing that gender to the lowest common denominators and spitting in its face. Where romcoms decided that women are crazy and desperate, bromances decreed that men are all homophobes with the maturity levels of six-year-olds.

What’s especially weird about these genres is that they’ve ended up depicting men and women in a far more insulting way than they were depicted in movies made 30 years ago. In 1980s romcoms such as Romancing the Stone and Moonstruck, the women are allowed to have jobs without this being depicted as proof of some kind of moral failure on their part. Try to think of a mainstream movie now in which a woman is more successful than a man and that’s seen as just fine. I’ll save you the time – you can’t, and a lot of that is down to romcoms, which were so concerned with universal accessibility that they ended up depicting women as idiots.

Similarly, to see how low bromances have brought men, you only need to look at a film made 30 years ago to which Get Hard bears more than a passing resemblance: Trading Places, starring Dan Aykroyd and Eddie Murphy. In fact, the opening 20 minutes of Get Hard are so similar to Trading Places – with some scenes being next to identical – that at first I thought the modern film was a remake. But where Trading Places mocks racial stereotypes, Get Hard embraces them; Ferrell’s black girlfriend’s face is almost unseen in the film as she’s too busy twerking the camera in hot pants. And where Trading Places’ depiction of prison is of a place of lost freedom and violence, the phallically obsessed Get Hard seems to have confused it with Sodom.

This is what happens when film- makers stop bothering with things like writing, and as Hollywood studios become more dependent on money from non-English speaking countries such as China, and therefore focus less on scripts, it will happen more and more (there is a reason superhero films are now the dominant genre).

So, so long bromances, you had a good run. But your fear of homosexuality and black people proves you no longer have any balls.