Sacramentians Must Demand Rent Control !


Image result for 16th street apartments sacramento sky view

Building Boom:  Many new apartments on 16th Street Midtown

“Rent Control in Sacramento?”

Every day renters in the State of California are waking up to 30 day notices on their doors or in the mail notifying them of rent increases of 20% to 50%.  Landlords, aren’t making capital improvements to their properties, or facing major tax increases or fees.  Its simply greed. No where in California is rent increasing faster than the Capitol City.  In fact there are only two other cites in the nation where rents are increasing faster than Sacramento, Arlington Texas and Reno Nevada.

There is currently a shortage of housing and construction workers in the state.

Sacramento’s Mayor Darrell Steinberg says he has “significant concerns” about rent control, saying the city should focus more on finding money for affordable housing and giving tenants additional notice when rents increase. Steinberg said he isn’t outright dismissing rent control, but he’s worried about the “unintended consequences” of discouraging developers from building housing.   Steinberg said much of the issue stems from the fact that Sacramento “is not building enough housing.” “We need to change that and be very aggressive about it,” (sacbee)

The reality is,citizens need relief yesterday.   Locating funding for affordable housing could take years or decades.  High rental costs will only increase homelessness in the city effecting the quality of life for all Sacramentians.

Basics in Bold Print

As of July 2017, average rent for an apartment in Sacramento, CA is $1439 which is a 14.18% increase from last year when the average rent was $1235 , and a 0.14% increase from last month when the average rent was $1437. 

One bedroom apartments in Sacramento rent for $1275 a month on average (a 15.45% increase from last year) and two bedroom apartment rents average $1507 (a 13.27% increase from last year). (source Rent Jungle. Com)

             ___________________

Wage Growth in Sacramento  5%

Minimum Wage in Sacramento $10.50

Minimum Monthly Income Required for a one bedroom Apartment in $3094.00 or $19.33 an hour.

Maximum Rent for an individual earning Minimum wage $693

(Source: https://www.zillow.com/rent-affordability-calculator/)

___________________

Every night, more than 3,600 people are homeless in Sacramento County, a statistic that’s 30 percent higher than it was in 2015. (SacBee)

Many homeless individuals are employed .According to a 2002 national study by the Urban Institute, about 45 percent of homeless adults had worked in the past 30 days. About 3.5 million people experience some kind of homelessness every year, and about a quarter of them are employed at the time (National Coalition for the Homeless) 

_______________________

What is Rent Control?

Rent control is a special set of laws that particular cities adopt. It generally includes rent increase limits and eviction restrictions. Some cities’ rent controls require relocation assistance to be paid to tenants under certain circumstances, and interest on security deposits.

These laws do not apply to other cities, nor to every rental unit in the city. One of the most commonly misunderstood ideas by tenants is that they were under rent control, when they weren’t.

 Los Angeles passed rent control in 1978 amid cries from the landlords that rent control would prevent future apartment construction, so Los Angeles exempted any structure built after October, 1978 as a political compromise. Newer structures [built after 1978] in Los Angeles are not under rent control, at all.

Under the “Costa-Hawkins” law, when a tenant voluntarily leaves or is evicted for most reasons [ie, not 30-day notice, nor after change of a term, for that term], the landlord can raise the rent to ANY AMOUNT for the new tenant, whose rents are thereafter locked into the rent control limits [3% or whatever].  Any rental unit built after 2/1/95, as well as houses and condos, are not under rent restrictions.  Even where these rent restrictions do not apply, eviction protections do continue.

Two new additions to LA Rent Control are worth noting. Ordinance 175130 [3/5/03] now prohibits the landlord from changing terms of tenancy [other than legal rent increases and government required terms] without mutual agreement of the tenant. Ordinance 174501 prohibits landlords from raising the tenant’s portion of rent [eg, beyond the legal 3%] after terminating a rental assistance program, like Section 8; the landlord can get out of the program, but gives up all the assistance money if he does.

Another exclusion applies to single family dwellings: a rented house by itself on a lot is not under rent control, but a duplex or “two on a lot” houses would be under rent control [if built before 1979]. There are other exclusions like college dorms, motels, and hospitals.

Cities that have rent control provide call-in numbers where you can find out whether the area you live in has rent control and whether your unit is registered under that rent control.

    Normally, rent can be increased with a 30-day notice.  However, due to the current wave of rent hikes, effective January 1, 2001, newly revised Civil Code Section 827 requires a 60-day notice if the rent increase will make that year’s increases exceed 10%.  The idea is to give tenants the ability to adjust to gouging rent increases, but not to stop them. The calculation is a little weird; it doesn’t have to be a large rent increase at once, but just the total of increases over a year.  This new law will mostly affect the expensive rentals, which also tend to have proportionately much bigger hikes.  Also, it does not affect yearly leases, but only month-to-month [or shorter] tenancies. This law expires automatically in 2006, unless the Legislature extends the time or makes it permanent.

    For example, if last year in January you were paying $500, and the landlord already raised the rent $25 in July, an increase for more than $25 this January would require a 60-day notice, because the total of increases for the year would be more than $50, 10% of $500. If the increase total was 10% or less for the year, all you get is the 30-day notice. If the year’s rent increases already total 10% and the landlord then wants to increase rent by one dollar, it has to be by 60-day notice, to mitigate the impact.

    The new law also adds 5 days for mailed notices of change of terms of tenancy. A mailed 30-day notice is effective 35 days later; a mailed 60-day notice is effective 65 days later.

How Can We Get Rent Control?

   Rent control is really only necessary where the vacancy rate in the area is below about 5%, because at about that point, landlords don’t worry about having a vacancy by raising the rent or neglecting repairs, and you don’t have much of a choice when you look around. Consequently, rent control is a law passed by cities where the housing market is tight and rents are going up just because landlords are in control of a necessity of life that is in short supply.  Rent control is not likely going to be a state law, because the problem is local.

   There are two ways to get rent control. The easiest but weakest is for your City Council to enact it, as Los Angeles did. The hardest but strongest is where tenants organize and put rent control on the ballot by getting petition signatures [and then the voters approve it], like Santa Monica did. Both of these require tenant voting clout, that a large number of tenants are registered to vote, do vote in the local election, and all vote together. If the City Council enacts it, it would be an ordinance [city law], but the voters can make it a Charter Amendment [a city constitutional change, more powerful].

    Your first step would be to go to the City Council meeting, and during the Oral Presentation portion [or whatever public input is called there], you tell them about the problem and ask if they are considering enacting rent control [like Beverly Hills, Palm Springs, San Francisco, Santa Monica, and other high class towns have], or at least Just Cause Eviction, like Glendale [a notoriously conservative town] has. You want to mention these towns in your presentation, since their first knee-jerk reaction is that “rent control destroys cities,” but they can hardly say that about those cities.

    They say whatever publicly, but you then make an appointment with them individually to see where they personally stand and how far they would go. You might find that Just Cause Eviction is not objectionable, and that they might even agree with paying relocation assistance for tenants of buildings being demolished or going through major rehabilitation or termite fumigation. Avoid being confrontational with them. They don’t want to offend the landlord contributors to their campaigns, but may be sympathetic enough to put their political toe into the water. If you get a majority of them to privately approve of something, one of them has to introduce the idea in public discussion.

   If the City Council is going to enact something, they want to be heroes for doing it, even if it’s short of rent control. While they are getting ready to take that step, you’ll want to be in touch with the local newspaper to talk about your plan to organize tenants for better legal protections. Once you’re in the news, other tenants will start to contact you, and you can form a group that can all go the City Council and amplify what you have said. This public clamor then triggers the City Council’s response to take action, and you’re on your way.  The group thanks the City Council for their concern and they get to see the public reaction to that.  If it’s a good reaction, they are encouraged to do more.

   Meanwhile, you do need to find other tenants who are both motivated to do something by their own situation and willing to put in some time to do it. Senior groups, somereligious institutions, teachers, firemen, labor unions, the local Democratic Club or similar liberal group, some liberal organizations, and a lot of local business owners, can help in various ways to get the word out and help you form a political group. There are a lot of talkers, but few doers, so you want to get volunteers into project-based committees, which naturally filter out the talkers. Here’s a helpful explanation for the new people.

   If you have to get rent control by petition, you might as well have the strongest possible law, since the landlords are not going to fight you any less if the law is weak. They fight dirty all the way, and always have. Election fraud is their main tool. Propaganda, false information, and misleading arguments are all you hear from them. They have the money to buy millions in political advertising, while you’ll be lucky to get out one mailer to the voters.  They will have celebrities and public figures telling the public that Rent Control will bring crime to your city, turn it into a slum, drive down their property values, steal from the landlords, prevent the landlords from being able to pay for repairs, run up millions in taxpayer expenses, and force landlords to evict all their tenants. Here’s some common rent control myths. None of these are true, of course, but unquestioning voters will be persuaded.  On your side, you have public controversy, newsworthiness, talk shows, newspaper stories, TV coverage, and pathetic stories about landlord abuses of vulnerable tenants. The political battle is not over the wording of the law, at all, but over emotional and philosophical issues in general.

   The technical wording of the rent control law requires a lawyer to write. It needs to be constitutional, not prevented by State laws, cover all the loopholes, and effectively create the kinds of protection you want. It has to be clear and organized, so that it can be easily followed and doesn’t end up in court for years. When it is circulated for signatures, there are specific laws that must be followed as to procedure, format, timing, and public information, and you should have a lawyer’s help to make sure that those things are done. This website CAN provide some of that assistance, but as a practical matter, local legal advice is necessary. For a start, here is a draft of a rent control law that you might want to circulate by petition in your city. It can be modified to some extent, easily, but major changes would require a re-drafting because so many things are interconnected within it. [Rent Control Draft]

   Tenant voter registration is an important part of this process. Tenants are so used to not having a say, not having their views considered, not having any power to change their lives, that voting seems inconsistent with how they’ve come to view themselves. Only about 5% of tenants actually vote in local elections. Tenants are truly a politically disenfranchised majority. Landlords are only 2% of the population, but seem to run things, because they leverage their money and power. A 10% tenant voter turnout could change the history of politics in your town. Politicians would stop saying they’re against rent control, and start expressing concern for the abused tenants who need their help. It’s a numbers game, to be sure.

   If you are really sincere about wanting to take action, there are groups like ACORN that will help, for a percentage of your donations. There may already be a tenant group formed in your town, which the local reporters or city clerk might know about, and you can join them. You aren’t the only one thinking like this. (source: http://www.caltenantlaw.com/rent-control/)

In San Francisco:Annual Allowable Rent Increase March 1, 2017 – February 28, 2018 = 2.2%  Most tenants are covered by rent control. This means rents can only be raised by certain amounts per year and the tenant can only be evicted for “just causes.” In addition, some rental units have restrictions on how much the landlord can charge the new tenant due to previous evictions. Tenants who do not have rent control can have their rent increased by any amount at any time with a proper written notice.

Rent control is administered by the San Francisco Rent Board. The Rent Board website has extensive information and you can download the San Francisco Rent Ordinance and Rent Board Rules and Regulations or come to our counseling clinic for more information.One of the more unjust parts of rent control is the capital improvement passthrough. Capital improvements are improvements for the building, the landlord’s investment, which tenants mostly pay for through a passthrough. Not only can the landlord get the tenants to pay for increasing the value of his or her investment, the landlord can then write the cost of the improvements off in their taxes. Capital improvements are things like new windows, a new roof, painting of the exterior of the building,  and other similar improvements to the property which add substantially to the life or value of the property as opposed to routine maintenance. Landlords must complete the work, petition the Rent Board and win approval of the rent increase before the cost can be passed on. Tenants can contest the increases at the hearing on certain grounds, like that the work was never done, or was not necessary, or was done to gentrify the building, but it is difficult to stop such a pass through in its entirety. (Source; https://www.sftu.org/rentcontrol/)

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Advertisements

OPINION: “Sacramento’s Measure B” Clang, clang, clang goes the trolley


Sacramento's historic street cars
For years, The Trolley, The Street Car was the mode of transportation for Sacramentians.
Today, many cities in the US have restored many of these cars and the iron beasts are again transporting people.

Next month, the City of Sacramento would like the voters to approve Measure B.    A 3.3 mile street car route that would begin at Civic Center in West Sacramento to 19th Street in Midtown.

The route would pass some of the area popular destination . Raley’s Field, Old Sacramento, The New Downtown Arena, Memorial Auditorium, Convention Center and Midtown

Those For Measure B Say

 Measure B will benefit all our neighborhoods by improving mobility between midtown, downtown, and West Sacramento with an affordable transit system that is authentically Sacramento.

Measure B will keep transit affordable for all Sacramentans. The Sacramento streetcar plan calls for inexpensive fares and will allow existing transit pass holders to ride for no additional cost.  A Yes vote on Measure B will simplify driving and parking downtown, saving money.

Measure B will help clean our air and reduce traffic congestion in our neighborhoods. The streetcar will connect to the light rail and bus system and allow easy connections to Amtrak, and eventually the airport.

Residential properties in the district will pay less than 1% of the cost for this project with 99% of the costs paid by the federal government, the State of California, the City of Sacramento, the City of West Sacramento, the County of Sacramento, and commercial property owners. Renters will pay nothing under Measure B. Seniors and residents living in affordable housing will pay nothing under Measure B. The project is a great deal for the people of Sacramento.

Measure B to improve our economy. Streetcars create a vibrant local economy, which means more small businesses and more jobs in downtown and midtown.  The streetcar project will help create 12,000 jobs and $2.5 billion in economic development over 20 years.

Streetcars will provide an inexpensive, safe, and fun way to get around Sacramento.  Measure B will allow seniors, students, visitors, workers, and central city residents to go car-free.

Streetcars are part of Sacramento’s legacy and it’s time to bring them back. Neighborhood leaders, community leaders, and business owners urge you to Vote Yes on Measure B. Help Sacramento construct an affordable and practical system to connect our neighborhoods.

Those Against Measure B Say

Six Reasons to vote NO on the Streetcar Tax:

(1) The streetcar district tax will pay only for construction.  It will cost district property owners $90 million over 30 years, and will be passed on in commercial and residential rent hikes to tenants.

(2) The streetcar project will operate at an enormous annual loss. Ticket sales are expected to cover about 20% of cost of operation; the other 80% will require a subsidy.  The shortfall will likely come from the City’s General Fund, reducing local services such as parks, bike lanes, street repairs, the homeless, and police.

(3) Are you willing to park several blocks from your home to provide arena parking solutions? With 150-200 arena events annually, look for an invasion of out-of-town drivers.  Streetcars will transport arena patrons to and from cheap parking in nearby neighborhoods.  The result: circling traffic and a severe loss of parking for residents, their visitors and businesses.

(4) The streetcar project is wasteful transit duplication.  It runs on, or near, the same Streets served by existing light rail and buses.  It will worsen mobility for pedestrians and those using the existing public transit system.  Tracks add danger to bicyclists.

(5) The project worsens traffic by adding slow-moving, frequent-stopping streetcars. These will create delays at intersections and to-and-from I-5, especially on the 3rd Street route that crosses L, J, and I Streets.

(6) Politicians hype the streetcar as a catalyst for development.  However, development is already happening on K, R and 16th Streets and other parts of the Central City.  Why squander scarce City resources on an unnecessary project?

The streetcar project is essentially an amusement park ride rather than an important transit improvement.


Sactomatoville Post Opinion 

Sacramento a needs good  24/7 comprehensive transportation system.  Regional Transit is one of the largest systems in county  covering over 420 square miles. However, it seems  designed for state employees, it doesn’t serve the airport or popular destinations
 
On the surface,Measure B covers all the bases.  It connects most of the areas popular destinations.  In other cities the street cars supplement transit by connecting popular destinations .  Supporters say Measure B will help clean our air and reduce traffic congestion in our neighborhoods.   The reality is majority of the people who attend events at the Raley’s Field, The New Arena,  Convention Center live east, north and south of proposed route who currently drive to these events will continue to drive to those events. 
 So the question becomes, who would ride this trolley? 
 
The proposed route would go through sparsely populated neighborhoods of both cities. The citizens of West Sacramento currently use Yolo Bus to take them to Amtrak and the other attractions downtown. Those who take RT will continue to take RT to downtown.   
 
I support public transportation. After 6pm, light rail is looking for passengers. When the New Arena opens next year there will be severe traffic challenges downtown.  In a perfect world, a Transit Center would open near the arena with sizable staging area for buses and light rail that might encourage attendees to take public transit .
 Without venturing into taxes and costs to business and citizens, you have to address need. Sacramento isn’t currently a major tourist destination. There are fewer than 3000 hotel rooms downtown.   Regional Transit is in desperate need of money and creative minds. to resign a system for an rapidly changing region.    At one point in the near future, Sacramento might benefit from a trolley line from West Sacramento to Midtown.  But were not there yet.   Vote No on Measure B 
CityFella
 

Late Late Late Night Eats….. Midtown Sacramento Del Taco Vs Micky D’s and a lil Sugah


1426410307379

By: CityFella

You’ve burned all those calories on the dance floor, you may just want a lil snack or bigger snack. More than a dozen clubs and hundreds of people. Not many food choices after the clubs close in Downtown/Midtown.  In fact all the eateries are on the far side of  Midtown…     If you wanna sit down, there’s the Ihop on L and Alhambra or Mel’s.  Not only is there a wait at Mels by 2am  but parking is gonna be a challenge until about 3:30 am.

Where is a good food truck when your hungry!!!!!

Shift in Palettes? 

I’ve noticed something weird midtown.  Del Taco and Micky D’s eateries are almost across from each other. During the day the popular drive through is Micky D’s however after say 1.30 its Del Taco with the lines stretching  down Alhambra to J Street .   At the same time, just a few cars at Micky D’s . Things that make you go…. hmmmm?

One more thing……….

A bigger restaurant just meant bigger lines.  When ya want something sweet … “Its Rick Dessert Diner”

This is a Sweet Vid by Karmin

 

OOOOOOOOO–H  “Sugah”

Puffing outdoors in Sacramento


Remember the days when there were smoking sections in Restaurants?  Smoke so intelligent, it knew to stay it its section.

Today, there are fewer and fewer places where a smoker can smoke.  In California, there are cities where you cant smoke outdoors.

In California and a number of states it is against the law to smoke in restaurants and bars.  However, smokers are allowed to smoke outside.

My city representative Councilmember Steve Hansen is leaning towards a citywide ban on outdoor  smoking in the cities Restaurants and Bars.

According to the American Lung Association in California, 73 cities in the state prohibit smoking in all outdoor dining areas; 42 restrict outdoor smoking with some exceptions.

Steve Hansen told the Bee ;“I’ve heard from a lot of people who think it would be meaningful and that they would eat out more often if they went there knowing there wouldn’t be smoking,”

I am a non smoker, militant in some circles and yet I have mixed feeling on an ordinance that would restrict smoking outdoors    In my perfect world no one would smoke anything anywhere.

In Sacramento, you cant smoke in building, in and around hospitals.   Sacramento State now has  limited smoking on Campus.

Twenty years ago non-smokers had few rights, today its the smokers.  If I where having a meal outdoors and a smoker lit up near me, my meal would be ruined.   With that said, I would not support a measure that would limit outdoor smoking.

Your thoughts?

CityFella

Mercantile Saloon : Sac Magic


By: CityFella

I believe Bar’s, Clubs have distinct personalities. Some are buttoned up, others casual. Most appeal to a specific crowd or audience.  The Mercantile Saloon,(called the Merc by the locals) attracts a wide audience. The Merc is a working gay bar with a large heterosexual following.

The scene is causal, men and women, ages range from barely legal to senior citizens plus.  Its a great place to people watch (especially on the weekends).

In my mind the Merc is unique.   First you add the flavors, a liberal amount of  Black,White,Latino, Asian’s then add in a large helping of straights and gays ,mix well and you have a unique dish called the Merc.

It’s place where straight people aren’t threatened, says Jennifer T.of Elk Grove.  I came here 17 years ago.  I was engaged to a man at the time starting a new life here in Sacramento.  I came here with co-workers on a friday night. The Merc was the first gay bar I’d ever been in, and  I was a wreck inside.  After 10 minutes, I remember saying to myself  this is okay  I can handle this, I am in a gay bar.  Then we went to Faces, where I had a major panic attack.   When I came out twelve years ago, I brought my sister and my Aunt’s here.   I don’t come here as much as I use to and there are a lot of new faces but I still love it her. 

Its two bars,  Inside, you can hear people singing,rocking in their seats to their favorite songs.  You might see drag queens, playing pool with construction workers.  Regulars sitting at the bar watching whatever is on TV sitting next to elegantly dressed matrons who have long toned down their drag.      Farm boys/men getting dragged  up for the first time

Outside, the patio is filled with circular tables and a long bench seat along  the fence is by far the most popular area in the bar  Seasoned men watching the young, sometime shaking their head in disapproval.  The young watching the old wondering why they aren’t home. not realizing one day they will sit at that table.  Experienced drag queens advising the farm boys/men.   Its loud, and on the weekends every square inch is filled with drink and laughter.

People who have never traveled out of Sacramento are unaware of the magic here. A few years ago I was ushered out of a bar in the Midwest, because my friends were concerned about my safety.   It seems (I learned later) after 10pm this nightclub was unsafe for people of color, especially blacks.  In 2014 the ism’s still exists.  So far I haven’t come encountered many of them in Sacratomatoville.  The clientele of the Merc represents the best of Sacramento a gathering place devoid of lines.

No one is likely to remember your name, but I think you’ll be glad you came.

The Mercantile Saloon is located at 1928 L St, (19th and L) Sacramento, CA 95811