Advertisements

Man buys entire family DNA tests for Christmas and there are some shocking results


A man has revealed how he almost ruined his family Christmas (stock image) (Image: Getty Images)

By: Courtney Pochin/UK Mirror

There’s always one family member who turns up at Christmas with a rather bizarre present.

 

From homemade items that didn’t quite go to plan, to last minute gifts purchased on the way over, we thought we’d seen it all.

But one man has raised the bar for unusual presents by purchasing DNA testing kits for his entire family – and the bemusing item almost ruined Christmas for everyone.

The unnamed son revealed all in a post online, which has had thousands of views.

He bought the same gift for everyone (stock photo) (Image: Getty Images)

Taking to Reddit, the man starts his story by revealing that earlier in the year AncestryDNA had a sale on their kit and for some reason he thought it would be a great gift, so he bought six of them – one for himself, his mum, his dad, brother and two sisters.

However when it came time to open presents on December 25, the kits didn’t exactly garner the reaction he’d been hoping for.

He wrote: “As soon as everyone opened their gift, my mom started freaking out. She told us she didn’t want us taking them because they had unsafe chemicals. We explained to her how there were actually no chemicals, but we could tell she was still flustered.

“Later she started trying to convince us that only one of us kids need to take it since we will all have the same results and to resell extra kits to save money.”

The man bought DNA tests for his whole family – and almost ruined Christmas (Image: Getty)

The children were still keen to give the tests a go which caused an argument to break out between the parents.

According to the post, the pair went upstairs and argued for about an hour, leaving the four kids to wonder what exactly was going on.

At this point, the man truly thought he’d “f***** up” and ruined the family Christmas.

But then things took a surprising turn.

TIFU by buying everyone an AncestryDNA kit and ruining Christmas

Earlier this year, AncestryDNA had a sale on their kit. I thought it would be a great gift idea so I bought 6 of them for Christmas presents. Today my family got together to exchange presents for our Christmas Eve tradition, and I gave my mom, dad, brother, and 2 sisters each a kit.

As soon as everyone opened their gift at the same time, my mom started freaking out. She told us how she didn’t want us taking them because they had unsafe chemicals. We explained to her how there were actually no chemicals, but we could tell she was still flustered. Later she started trying to convince us that only one of us kids need to take it since we will all have the same results and to resell extra kits to save money.

Fast forward: Our parents have been fighting upstairs for the past hour, and we are downstairs trying to figure out who has a different dad.

TL;DR I bought everyone in my family AncestryDNA kit for Christmas. My mom started freaking. Now our parents are fighting and my dad might not be my dad.

Update: Thank you so much for all the love and support. My sisters, brother and I have not yet decided yet if we are going to take the test. No matter what the results are, we will still love each other, and our parents no matter what.

Update 2: CHRISTMAS ISN’T RUINED! My FU actually turned into a Christmas miracle. Turns out my sisters father passed away shortly after she was born. A good friend of my moms was able to help her through the darkest time in her life, and they went on to fall in love and create the rest of our family. They never told us because of how hard it was for my mom. Last night she was strong enough to share stories and photos with us for the first time, and it truly brought us even closer together as a family. This is a Christmas we will never forget. And yes, we are all excited to get our test results. Merry Christmas everyone!

P.S. Sorry my mom isn’t a whore. No you’re not my daddy.

 

His parents eventually came back down and shared some shocking news with them all – one of them had a different dad.

He explained: “Turns out my sister’s father passed away shortly after she was born. A good friend of my mom’s was able to help her through the darkest time in her life, and they went on to fall in love and create the rest of our family.

“They never told us because of how hard it was for my mom.”

The parents went on to share stories and photos for the first time and the son claims the experience brought them “even closer together as a family”.

The situation ended up bringing them closer together (stock photo) (Image: Getty)

He added: “This is a Christmas we will never forget. And yes, we are all excited to get out test results. Merry Christmas everyone!”

More than 9,000 people have taken the time to comment on his post, with many sharing their own unusual family stories.

One person wrote: “I was adopted by my grandparents and didn’t know until I was older. The person I grew up with as an older sister was actually my biological mother.”

Another said: “My friend discovered through AncestryDNA that her grandpa wasn’t actually her grandpa. Her actual grandpa was one of her grandparents’ neighbors.”

A third added: “I work at AncestryDNA. This actually happens all the time.”

Advertisements

German project spotlights happiness through the eyes of a child


German project spotlights happiness through the eyes of a child

Happy surfing students. Photo: Karina Sillmann

By: Rachel Stern/The Local Germany

What is a happy day for you? To find the best answers, dance teacher Karina Sillmann began asking the children, ages 7-12, in her class in Aschaffenburg near Frankfurt.

Even over the holidays, amid the gift-giving and glittering Christmas markets, happiness for them boiled down to the immaterial. One girl said her most joyful day was baking cookies with her mom. For others it was simply spending time with their sister, brother, parents or anyone they love.

“I like the honesty that children have and I was curious of their answers,” said Sillmann, who began collecting their answers in the form of letters. “It shows that the simple things make us happy.”

An avid world traveller, Sillmann sought to hear what happiness is for children around the world – from Bolivia to Thailand. In February, she started Children’s Happy Days project, and through the blog and connections in other countries, began asking for letters from around the globe.

Sillmann has now received 52 letters from 16 different countries, and responds to each of them personally – sometimes through the help of friends who can translate, as was the case when she received a letter from a boy in Thailand.

She published the letters on her website as a way of reminding people what happiness is when seen from a child’s perspective.

When she travels abroad on holidays, Sillmann also participates in other sports projects with children, be it surfing on the Portuguese coast, or football in the hills of Bolivia.

The dance-enthusiast observed how movement makes children happy – abroad and at back at home. “A happy day to me is a day on which I can dance or do gymnastics. I just feel well then,” wrote a 10-year-old student from her class.

Letter reprint courtesy Karina Sillmann. Photo: DPA

Other non-materialistic experiences that give Sillmann’s students joy are finding a new song to dance to, or inventing their own dance moves, she says.

In general happiness lies in their favourite hobbies such as reading books from a particular writer, playing an instrument or doing sports.

“It’s good to see the world through the eyes of a child,” said Sillmann who continues to collect letters through post. “We often forget what’s important.”

On her website, Sillmann writes letters in five languages, including her German mother-tongue, to request letters from around the world. Photo courtesy: Karina Sillmann

Home with a box of Kelloggs Corn Flakes


In 1894, John Harvey Kellogg created a food that he thought would be healthy for the patients of a Sanitarium where he was the Superintendent in Battle Creek Michigan. 

The cereal was made by toasting flakes of corn .  

  In 1906, he started a business making corn flakes, and by 1914 its was sold all over the United States, today its sold all the world. 

I was introdued to Kelloggs when I was four or five.  This was well before Fruit Loops or Lucky Charms and other sugary cereals.  I digress,  I forgot “Tony the Tiger” the mascot, the spokestiger of “Sugar Frosted Flakes.  

Kelloggs Corn Flakes is my comfort food, its not a part of my daily diet, but there is always a box in my pantry.  Its there in a pinch.  I have a bowl if  I’m super stressed.  It’s  calming and familar.  Perhaps its reminds me of my mom.   But its there when I need it… A bowl of Kelloggs Corn Flakes, not Post Toasties or some generic corn flakes, Kelloggs.

Researching this story, I found an interesting tidbit.    In addition to Kelloggs, Post Cereal was also founded in Battle Creek Michigan, the cereal capital of the world.    Charles William Post was a patient at the Battle Creek Sanitarium where Mr Kellogg was the Superintendent.      

A year after Kellogg developed corn flakes,  Mr Post developed a drinkable cereal called Postum.  Two years after Kellogg’s corn flakes went to market. Post Toasties was introduced and so was a rivalery.

While Kelloggs is my choice of corn flake I find Post Raisin Brand superior to Kelloggs Raisin Brand. 

The defination of “Comfort Food”  is food that provides a nostalgic or sentimental value to someone, and may be characterized by its high caloric nature, high carbohydrate level, or simple preparation. The nostalgia may be specific to an individual, or it may apply to a specific culture.

My  Comfort Food

Image result for kelloggs corn flakes

CityFella

Family Brand


Image result for buick symbol

There are entire families who for whatever reason buy a specific car brand or make.   There are Ford, Chevy, Honda, and Toyota Families where most of the people in that family buy a particular make

My parents brought me home from the hospital in an Old Green Buick Roadmaster, I’m not sure if it was made in the late 1940’s or early 50’s.  I’m sure my older brother who was in high school at the time,hoped they had dropped me with another family.

The Roadmaster ran until it didn’t, it was replaced with my mothers dream car, 1955 white and blue Buick Century.  As a very young child I remembered the heater didn’t work and neither did the radio.  The engine made a very loud sound on the freeway when you accelerated.  My mother loved that car.

The Century stopped running a couple of years after my dad died.  While I had dreams of being a passenger in a Mustang, T-Bird or Pontiac GTO, she replaced the Buick with an ugly hang your head in shame 1964 Brown Chevy Bel Air.    It was the first car we owned that wasn’t of a different decade. In this car the heater worked and the am radio was intermittent, a bump in the road could bring music or take it away.

My brother was a Chrysler fan and owned a bright blue Desoto when I was a child.  After he married be bought a Cadillac.

Image result for 1965 buick skyland grand sport

His first new car was 1965 Buick Skylark Grand Sport, it was Red and a black vinyl roof the car had 4 on the floor attached to a monster 455 cubic inch V8.    My mother became a legend the first time she drove the car.   It was a perfect day, everyone seemed to be outside.  My mother was used to driving the BelAir with a small block V8 .  Not the monster 455.   Pulling away from the curb she left two perfect skid marks half way down the block.   People cheered, my brother and I were proud.  We also knew she was scared shitless.  When she returned, people crossed the street surrounding my mother in the car. She acted as if she did this everyday.  No longer was she the widow, Sunday school teacher,  she was a bad ass!

I’m not a psychologist I wonder why do entire families buy a certain brand?    At the time, Buick’s weren’t  reliable cars, they shared parts with other General Motors vehicles.  But its something about the Buick, they always get my attention.  Its like the brand is in my blood, I have never owned Buick.

  The first brand my son remembers was a Mazda, years later his first car was a Mazda. A couple of years ago he bought a Toyota SUV but he looks at Mazda ‘s as I do Buick’s. I know there is a a part of him wishes he bought a Mazda.           Zoom Zoom

CityFella

.

 

 

 

In Pictures: 17,000 turn out for the poshest picnic in Paris


In Pictures: 17,000 turn out for the poshest picnic in Paris
Photo: AFP
From: The Local France
This year’s “Dinner in white” – a chic, pop-up style picnic drew a record 17,000 diners all dressed in white. Here are some pictures of the impressive spectacle.

The annual “diner en blanc” picnic took place in Paris on  at the Esplanade des Invalides and drew a record 17,000 participants, according to organisers.

The location of the giant chic picnic is only revealed at the last minute. In previous years it has taken place outside Notre Dame Cathedral or the Louvre Museum.

The picnic is not authorised by authorities but “tolerated”. Although the organisers made an exception and asked authorities and police if they could hold it on the Champs-Elysées. But their request was turned down and they chose the Invalides as plan b.

Last month’s  attendance was twice the size of previous gatherings and the 17,000 picnickers also included 6,000 from abroad, who had come to Paris specially for the occasion.

The “diner en blanc” phenomenon  was celebrating its 30th anniversary. The concept began in France but has since spread to other cities around the world including New York and Sydney.

There are certain rules those attending have to stick by, notably they must wear white. They are also not allowed to leave behind any trace of rubbish and strong alcohol and beer are banned.

They are informed at the last minute about the location and have to bring fold up tables and chairs. Remarkably it only takes a few minutes to set up.

 

Anonymous shopper buys $1M of toys from Toys ‘R’ Us store and donates the toys


Image result for toys r us raleigh

 

An anonymous person bought $1 million worth of toys at a Raleigh, North Carolina Toys “R” Us last week and reportedly donated them to children.

Employees at the store said that they spent all of Friday — the last day the toy store chain was in business — boxing up toys for the anonymous buyer and had to get toys from other locations to fill the order.

It’s not clear where the toys were sent.

Packing all those toys required the store to be closed one day early and shoppers hoping to get discounted toys before the store closed were turned away. But when WNCN-TV told them about the donation, would-be customers weren’t disappointed.

“Oh, that’s so nice. I’m happy to hear that,” said customer Erin Sampson.

On Friday, June 29, all Toys ‘R’ Us locations around the country were permanently closed after the chain filed for bankruptcy last summer and failed to find a new buyer to take over operations.

How I tackled life in Sweden as an Indian woman


 How I tackled life in Sweden as an Indian woman

 Vanitha Durai explains how she managed to get Indian women in Gothenburg to form a strong online community.

MY SWEDISH CAREER: The Local speaks with Vanitha Durai, an Indian Volvo Cars worker in Gothenburg who started a popular community for Indian women in Gothenburg.

From: The Local Sweden

So what do you do when you arrive in a foreign city and find yourself convinced that you’re not the only Indian housewife struggling to find something to do?

Well, if you’re Vanitha Durai, you simply create the group that you want to join.

And so the Indian Women in Gothenburg community was born, an online group that has flourished and now  hosts all kinds of events for its community of hundreds.

“I felt the need for a small group to discuss the difficulties of moving here, things like not having a job, or what it’s like to follow a spouse to Sweden,” she tells The Local.

“At first it was a kind of recreational thing, but then we started thinking how to expand it, and soon it became a place for people to find job-finding help, to have discussions, and to find things for their children.”

The group has since hosted events for Diwali Day, which marks the culmination of the week-long Hindu festival of lights, and summer camps for children.

Most recently, the group has hosted a flashmob event in a Gothenburg mall.

“The point of the flashmob was to celebrate the beauty of womanhood. Half of the women aren’t trained dancers, it was more a matter of accepting who we all are and sharing positive vibes,” she says.

Finding work for herself was another challenge that the 34-year-old tackled, eventually landing a job in business management with Volvo Cars.

Now in her fifth year in Sweden, Durai admits that it’s rarely an easy path when you’re looking for a career in Sweden.

“Of course you have a barrier with the language, that’s the main thing, and that isn’t helped that there aren’t many job opportunities,” she says.

“I think the main thing is you need to know a little bit of Swedish, enough to understand what’s going on, then also enough to express yourself in a way that people can understand.”

But her main tip, she says, is to really make the most of any interview opportunities.

“The interview is the place where you can really prove yourself. You have to use that opportunity to the fullest to prove that you can really do even more than what’s shown on your CV,” she says.

Of course, you have to adapt to life in Sweden too – which was an easy step for Durai, who originally hails form Chennai in southern India – some 7,500 kilometres from Gothenburg.

“The job culture is very welcoming here, but you have to get in – the entry part is the toughest step,” she says.

“But Sweden is a very good place to live and to bring up kids. The benefits are excellent and it’s a safe environment for the family.”

Indeed, the value placed on family life in Sweden is one of the things Durai highlights about Sweden in general.

“I feel the quality of life is good, you get a lot of time with the family, evenings, weekends, there is no pressure – you have your vacation,” she says.

%d bloggers like this: