Sacramento: The Best Place to Stay when you want to get your Party On!


 

 Long lines down 15th waiting to enter Midtown’s “Ultra Lounge

18 Blocks Long (10th to 28th)

5 blocks wide (I to Capitol)

Its the weekend, and your looking for grown up entertainment, in most cities San Francisco, Atlanta, Los Angeles, Portland if you want to change to a different venue say classical to rock.  It means you must drive across town.

In midtown Sacramento, Moroccan Belly Dancers are a block from LGBT dance clubs, a block from Beer Gardens, Live Rock Venues, Country, Sports Bars, Cigar Bars, Wine Tasting Rooms  Blues Clubs. and Restaurants.

Sacramento?

The Best Place to Stay in And Get your party on?

Residence Inn Capitol Park


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The Residence Inn Capital Park is the ONLY hotel in Sacramento that has six restaurants, two dance clubs and four bars on the same block!  

If you have a fear of crossing streets this is your place in Sactown!

 The hotel has its own a bar and grill called ” The HOTEL Bar .  

You literally do not have to leave the block!

Should you cross the street…..

There are nine more restaurants and two of dance clubs and of course the State Capitol

The Ultra Lounge is directly Across the Streets as is Cafeteria 15L

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Drink and Ride

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Sactown’s Midtown is lively, surprising, with a variety of restaurants and venues. Park you car, you’ll find something in Midtown.

Note: This is not a paid advertisement for the Residence Inn Capitol Park.

 

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He Urinated on the Deputy


 

Placer County Deputies noticed ,Sacramento resident, Steven Holley was acting strangely around the Miners Ravine Natures Preserve in Granite Bay on Thursday..

In a short struggle with the deputies, the 55 year old’s dingy sprung a leak and he urinated on the Deputy.

The Deputies found methamphetamine and drug paraphernalia, on the moist suspect.

Perhaps, Holley will used the patent”I was looking for a rest room and how did those get in there?”defense.

CityFella

 

Fully Employed and Homeless


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Photo\Sacramento Bee

No they’re not colorful mirage’s lining the streets of Sacramento.  Camping tents are nightly homes for some of the thousands of homeless individuals in Sacramento. The fortunate have tents and sleeping bags the majority sleep on the city streets without shelter sleeping directly in elements

Many of the homeless are fully employed . Living in cars, other in tents.  Trying to save enough to move into an apartment.   Some have been displaced by rising rents. There are jobs in Sacramento, most paying less than $16.00 an hour.   To afford an apartment in the city, you need to earn nearly $32.00 an hour.

I recently met a family living inside a shell of a relatively new truck at a downtown park.   In July, this family of four received a notice that their rent would increase by $600 on a home they have lived in four years.   Three members of the family are  fully employed, the youngest is in middle school. Every morning they drive him to school every morning.

The family meals are prepared in local parks.  At night they sleep in the bed of the truck and shower at a near by truck stop.  The family is relocating to Woodland next month ,downsizing to a two bed room apartment.  The relocation mean two members of the household  will have to find new jobs.

In much of the state renters are more than concerned as rents are increasing at high rate, displacing thousands of Californians. While there is some resistance in government to implement rent control. it’s difficult to justify rent increases of 30% or more with out capitol improvements or tax increases it is simply a form of gouging

This form of gouging will add  to homeless population and have a negative effect of the cities funds . In 2015, the city said it spends more than $13.6 million annually to address homeless.  The homeless population has increased by 31% in the last two years.

According to the 2015 Point-in-Time Homeless Count for Sacramento County, on any given night,approximately 2,650 people throughout Sacramento County experience homelessness. Over the course of a year, it is estimated that over 5,000 people will be homeless for one or more nights in Sacramento. While the majority of these people are sheltered, just over one third (predominantly single adults) are unsheltered, typically sleeping in their vehicles, an encampment, or another outdoor location.

????? If your rent increased  by 40% or more. Could you absorb the cost or would you relocate?

CityFella

 

Sacramentians Must Demand Rent Control !


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Building Boom:  Many new apartments on 16th Street Midtown

“Rent Control in Sacramento?”

Every day renters in the State of California are waking up to 30 day notices on their doors or in the mail notifying them of rent increases of 20% to 50%.  Landlords, aren’t making capital improvements to their properties, or facing major tax increases or fees.  Its simply greed. No where in California is rent increasing faster than the Capitol City.  In fact there are only two other cites in the nation where rents are increasing faster than Sacramento, Arlington Texas and Reno Nevada.

There is currently a shortage of housing and construction workers in the state.

Sacramento’s Mayor Darrell Steinberg says he has “significant concerns” about rent control, saying the city should focus more on finding money for affordable housing and giving tenants additional notice when rents increase. Steinberg said he isn’t outright dismissing rent control, but he’s worried about the “unintended consequences” of discouraging developers from building housing.   Steinberg said much of the issue stems from the fact that Sacramento “is not building enough housing.” “We need to change that and be very aggressive about it,” (sacbee)

The reality is,citizens need relief yesterday.   Locating funding for affordable housing could take years or decades.  High rental costs will only increase homelessness in the city effecting the quality of life for all Sacramentians.

Basics in Bold Print

As of July 2017, average rent for an apartment in Sacramento, CA is $1439 which is a 14.18% increase from last year when the average rent was $1235 , and a 0.14% increase from last month when the average rent was $1437. 

One bedroom apartments in Sacramento rent for $1275 a month on average (a 15.45% increase from last year) and two bedroom apartment rents average $1507 (a 13.27% increase from last year). (source Rent Jungle. Com)

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Wage Growth in Sacramento  5%

Minimum Wage in Sacramento $10.50

Minimum Monthly Income Required for a one bedroom Apartment in $3094.00 or $19.33 an hour.

Maximum Rent for an individual earning Minimum wage $693

(Source: https://www.zillow.com/rent-affordability-calculator/)

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Every night, more than 3,600 people are homeless in Sacramento County, a statistic that’s 30 percent higher than it was in 2015. (SacBee)

Many homeless individuals are employed .According to a 2002 national study by the Urban Institute, about 45 percent of homeless adults had worked in the past 30 days. About 3.5 million people experience some kind of homelessness every year, and about a quarter of them are employed at the time (National Coalition for the Homeless) 

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What is Rent Control?

Rent control is a special set of laws that particular cities adopt. It generally includes rent increase limits and eviction restrictions. Some cities’ rent controls require relocation assistance to be paid to tenants under certain circumstances, and interest on security deposits.

These laws do not apply to other cities, nor to every rental unit in the city. One of the most commonly misunderstood ideas by tenants is that they were under rent control, when they weren’t.

 Los Angeles passed rent control in 1978 amid cries from the landlords that rent control would prevent future apartment construction, so Los Angeles exempted any structure built after October, 1978 as a political compromise. Newer structures [built after 1978] in Los Angeles are not under rent control, at all.

Under the “Costa-Hawkins” law, when a tenant voluntarily leaves or is evicted for most reasons [ie, not 30-day notice, nor after change of a term, for that term], the landlord can raise the rent to ANY AMOUNT for the new tenant, whose rents are thereafter locked into the rent control limits [3% or whatever].  Any rental unit built after 2/1/95, as well as houses and condos, are not under rent restrictions.  Even where these rent restrictions do not apply, eviction protections do continue.

Two new additions to LA Rent Control are worth noting. Ordinance 175130 [3/5/03] now prohibits the landlord from changing terms of tenancy [other than legal rent increases and government required terms] without mutual agreement of the tenant. Ordinance 174501 prohibits landlords from raising the tenant’s portion of rent [eg, beyond the legal 3%] after terminating a rental assistance program, like Section 8; the landlord can get out of the program, but gives up all the assistance money if he does.

Another exclusion applies to single family dwellings: a rented house by itself on a lot is not under rent control, but a duplex or “two on a lot” houses would be under rent control [if built before 1979]. There are other exclusions like college dorms, motels, and hospitals.

Cities that have rent control provide call-in numbers where you can find out whether the area you live in has rent control and whether your unit is registered under that rent control.

    Normally, rent can be increased with a 30-day notice.  However, due to the current wave of rent hikes, effective January 1, 2001, newly revised Civil Code Section 827 requires a 60-day notice if the rent increase will make that year’s increases exceed 10%.  The idea is to give tenants the ability to adjust to gouging rent increases, but not to stop them. The calculation is a little weird; it doesn’t have to be a large rent increase at once, but just the total of increases over a year.  This new law will mostly affect the expensive rentals, which also tend to have proportionately much bigger hikes.  Also, it does not affect yearly leases, but only month-to-month [or shorter] tenancies. This law expires automatically in 2006, unless the Legislature extends the time or makes it permanent.

    For example, if last year in January you were paying $500, and the landlord already raised the rent $25 in July, an increase for more than $25 this January would require a 60-day notice, because the total of increases for the year would be more than $50, 10% of $500. If the increase total was 10% or less for the year, all you get is the 30-day notice. If the year’s rent increases already total 10% and the landlord then wants to increase rent by one dollar, it has to be by 60-day notice, to mitigate the impact.

    The new law also adds 5 days for mailed notices of change of terms of tenancy. A mailed 30-day notice is effective 35 days later; a mailed 60-day notice is effective 65 days later.

How Can We Get Rent Control?

   Rent control is really only necessary where the vacancy rate in the area is below about 5%, because at about that point, landlords don’t worry about having a vacancy by raising the rent or neglecting repairs, and you don’t have much of a choice when you look around. Consequently, rent control is a law passed by cities where the housing market is tight and rents are going up just because landlords are in control of a necessity of life that is in short supply.  Rent control is not likely going to be a state law, because the problem is local.

   There are two ways to get rent control. The easiest but weakest is for your City Council to enact it, as Los Angeles did. The hardest but strongest is where tenants organize and put rent control on the ballot by getting petition signatures [and then the voters approve it], like Santa Monica did. Both of these require tenant voting clout, that a large number of tenants are registered to vote, do vote in the local election, and all vote together. If the City Council enacts it, it would be an ordinance [city law], but the voters can make it a Charter Amendment [a city constitutional change, more powerful].

    Your first step would be to go to the City Council meeting, and during the Oral Presentation portion [or whatever public input is called there], you tell them about the problem and ask if they are considering enacting rent control [like Beverly Hills, Palm Springs, San Francisco, Santa Monica, and other high class towns have], or at least Just Cause Eviction, like Glendale [a notoriously conservative town] has. You want to mention these towns in your presentation, since their first knee-jerk reaction is that “rent control destroys cities,” but they can hardly say that about those cities.

    They say whatever publicly, but you then make an appointment with them individually to see where they personally stand and how far they would go. You might find that Just Cause Eviction is not objectionable, and that they might even agree with paying relocation assistance for tenants of buildings being demolished or going through major rehabilitation or termite fumigation. Avoid being confrontational with them. They don’t want to offend the landlord contributors to their campaigns, but may be sympathetic enough to put their political toe into the water. If you get a majority of them to privately approve of something, one of them has to introduce the idea in public discussion.

   If the City Council is going to enact something, they want to be heroes for doing it, even if it’s short of rent control. While they are getting ready to take that step, you’ll want to be in touch with the local newspaper to talk about your plan to organize tenants for better legal protections. Once you’re in the news, other tenants will start to contact you, and you can form a group that can all go the City Council and amplify what you have said. This public clamor then triggers the City Council’s response to take action, and you’re on your way.  The group thanks the City Council for their concern and they get to see the public reaction to that.  If it’s a good reaction, they are encouraged to do more.

   Meanwhile, you do need to find other tenants who are both motivated to do something by their own situation and willing to put in some time to do it. Senior groups, somereligious institutions, teachers, firemen, labor unions, the local Democratic Club or similar liberal group, some liberal organizations, and a lot of local business owners, can help in various ways to get the word out and help you form a political group. There are a lot of talkers, but few doers, so you want to get volunteers into project-based committees, which naturally filter out the talkers. Here’s a helpful explanation for the new people.

   If you have to get rent control by petition, you might as well have the strongest possible law, since the landlords are not going to fight you any less if the law is weak. They fight dirty all the way, and always have. Election fraud is their main tool. Propaganda, false information, and misleading arguments are all you hear from them. They have the money to buy millions in political advertising, while you’ll be lucky to get out one mailer to the voters.  They will have celebrities and public figures telling the public that Rent Control will bring crime to your city, turn it into a slum, drive down their property values, steal from the landlords, prevent the landlords from being able to pay for repairs, run up millions in taxpayer expenses, and force landlords to evict all their tenants. Here’s some common rent control myths. None of these are true, of course, but unquestioning voters will be persuaded.  On your side, you have public controversy, newsworthiness, talk shows, newspaper stories, TV coverage, and pathetic stories about landlord abuses of vulnerable tenants. The political battle is not over the wording of the law, at all, but over emotional and philosophical issues in general.

   The technical wording of the rent control law requires a lawyer to write. It needs to be constitutional, not prevented by State laws, cover all the loopholes, and effectively create the kinds of protection you want. It has to be clear and organized, so that it can be easily followed and doesn’t end up in court for years. When it is circulated for signatures, there are specific laws that must be followed as to procedure, format, timing, and public information, and you should have a lawyer’s help to make sure that those things are done. This website CAN provide some of that assistance, but as a practical matter, local legal advice is necessary. For a start, here is a draft of a rent control law that you might want to circulate by petition in your city. It can be modified to some extent, easily, but major changes would require a re-drafting because so many things are interconnected within it. [Rent Control Draft]

   Tenant voter registration is an important part of this process. Tenants are so used to not having a say, not having their views considered, not having any power to change their lives, that voting seems inconsistent with how they’ve come to view themselves. Only about 5% of tenants actually vote in local elections. Tenants are truly a politically disenfranchised majority. Landlords are only 2% of the population, but seem to run things, because they leverage their money and power. A 10% tenant voter turnout could change the history of politics in your town. Politicians would stop saying they’re against rent control, and start expressing concern for the abused tenants who need their help. It’s a numbers game, to be sure.

   If you are really sincere about wanting to take action, there are groups like ACORN that will help, for a percentage of your donations. There may already be a tenant group formed in your town, which the local reporters or city clerk might know about, and you can join them. You aren’t the only one thinking like this. (source: http://www.caltenantlaw.com/rent-control/)

In San Francisco:Annual Allowable Rent Increase March 1, 2017 – February 28, 2018 = 2.2%  Most tenants are covered by rent control. This means rents can only be raised by certain amounts per year and the tenant can only be evicted for “just causes.” In addition, some rental units have restrictions on how much the landlord can charge the new tenant due to previous evictions. Tenants who do not have rent control can have their rent increased by any amount at any time with a proper written notice.

Rent control is administered by the San Francisco Rent Board. The Rent Board website has extensive information and you can download the San Francisco Rent Ordinance and Rent Board Rules and Regulations or come to our counseling clinic for more information.One of the more unjust parts of rent control is the capital improvement passthrough. Capital improvements are improvements for the building, the landlord’s investment, which tenants mostly pay for through a passthrough. Not only can the landlord get the tenants to pay for increasing the value of his or her investment, the landlord can then write the cost of the improvements off in their taxes. Capital improvements are things like new windows, a new roof, painting of the exterior of the building,  and other similar improvements to the property which add substantially to the life or value of the property as opposed to routine maintenance. Landlords must complete the work, petition the Rent Board and win approval of the rent increase before the cost can be passed on. Tenants can contest the increases at the hearing on certain grounds, like that the work was never done, or was not necessary, or was done to gentrify the building, but it is difficult to stop such a pass through in its entirety. (Source; https://www.sftu.org/rentcontrol/)

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Unstable foundation: Union leader says he was fired for starting investigation into Sacramento public housing agency


Jim Landberg, president of Local 146 Sacramento County California Employees SHRA, says the public housing agency fired him from his maintenance position after he started a union investigation into SHRA’s practices. PHOTO BY SCOTT THOMAS ANDERSON

Sacramento Housing and Redevelopment Agency faces new retaliation claims, tenant safety concerns

By Scott Thomas Anderson /Sacramento News and Review 

Weeks after a Sacramento Housing and Redevelopment Agency employee claimed she was terminated for whistleblowing, another longtime agency employee is stepping forward with the same accusation.

In June, Laura Cedidla said that SHRA, which controls all public housing in the city and county, fired her for reporting safety threats to tenants and employees. Cedidla shared her concerns with the Sacramento County grand jury, the federal Occupational Safety and Health Administration and her union, Local 146 Sacramento County California Employees SHRA.

Now, Jim Landberg, president of Local 146 and a former maintenance specialist for SHRA, says he was fired for launching a union investigation into Cedidla’s claims.

Testimony about conditions at SHRA properties was expected two weeks ago in a civil court case involving Cedidla. Residents at three SHRA complexes told SN&R last month that Cedidla was the most competent and responsive SHRA employee they’d encountered. Nevertheless, after Cedidla began speaking out about problems she perceived with SHRA management—ranging from neglected bedbug infestations to the handling of federal documents—management accused the seven-year employee of behaving threateningly toward other employees. In particular, SHRA interpreted a doodle she made during a staff meeting as a bomb threat. The agency filed a restraining order against Cedidla in March and started a termination process.

For the rest of the story Click the Link Below

https://www.newsreview.com/sacramento/unstable-foundation-union-leader-says/content?oid=24673415

 

 

Welcome to Sacramento: Get out of our Parks


 

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The Citizen’s Hotel opened in 2008.   The building was once the former headquarters of California Western State Life Insurance.

 Built in the 1920’s the building was one of Sacramento’s first skyscrapers.

The Citizens hotel has become very popular for those who want something different from the cookie cutter hotels in the area as no two rooms are alike.

The hotel is located at 10th and J Street downtown across the street from Cesar Chavez Park .  The park is well known in the area as a place for concerts. farmers markets, wine tasting and other events.

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 If your a guest of the hotel and want to sit down outside, its fine as long as its before 11pm.

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A first time visitor to Sacramento from Houston said he having a cigarette after a late meeting and was told by a police officer the park was closed and he would have leave.

Some cities close their parks in the evenings mitigate the homeless population.   With the exception of K street, there are few places, where one can sit down.

  The new Sawyer hotel next to Golden One Center opens in a few months.   The plaza between the new hotel/condo isn’t visitor friendly once the events has ended at the arena. The nearest park is Cesar Chavez.

The gentleman from Houston will share his experience at the park with others.  Perhaps to professionals in the Travel Industry.

  New York, Miami ,New Orleans, Memphis and Honolulu and others cities with large homeless populations have programs in place to keep their public parks and open areas near hotels and attractions safe for tourists.

Sacramento wants to be an destination. Attracting conventions and National sports events.  To accomplish that, the city will need to become visitor friendly.

CityFella

 

 

Policing: Its not just Black and White


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Tone

  1. a musical or vocal sound with reference to its pitch, quality, and strength. “the piano tone appears monochrome or lacking in warmth”

synonyms: timbre,sound,sound quality, voice, voice quality,color tonality “tone             of the tuba”

  1. the general character or attitude of a place, piece of writing, situation,etc. “trust            her to lower the tone of the conversation”

synonyms: mood, air,spirit, feel ,sound,flavor, note, attitude, character, nature,              manner, temper;

 

The Tale of Two Communities

A large backyard barbecue, the crowd overflowing into the garage and the front yard. The homeowners are in their late forties.  Alcohol fueled aggression and loud talking resulted into a complaint call by someone in the neighborhood.   Two Sacramento County Sheriff Cars Arrived with lights flashing, a few minutes later a third car arrived.

One man in the garage is agitated by the presence of the officers. The homeowner and a women attempt  to calm him.  As they were talking to him, others ,seeing the flashing lights came out of the backyard.    As one family was leaving, an officer yelled at them and told to stand near the fence.   The women said they were going home.  Another women in the crowd screamed at the officer, ” they ani’t doing nothing why cant they go home? Another officer calmly asked  them to wait.    This irritated some  of the people watching.  Some of them said, the first officer had an attitude and was unnecessarily aggressive.  Within a couple of minutes other Sheriff cars appeared.    While some members of the party were quietly leaving,others were angrily talking to the officers.  One young man, fueled by alcohol began shouting at the officers and two officers restrained him. They eventually released him.   After 30 minutes, it was all over.

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In another community,  Homeowners in the mid fifties.  A wedding party went later than planned.  Late night alcohol fueled aggression and excessive noise party resulted into a complaint call by one of the neighbors.

My friend said their were no flashing lights as the police car arrived. The officer asked to speak to the homeowner.     There was a lot of loud music in the backyard.  As the officer passed me, he said good evening.   He and the owner asked people to quiet down in the backyard,the music was turned off.    One man, who could barely stand, swore at the officer. Another attendee, started yelling at a young man who was siting at a table threatening him.    As I was watching this unfold,another officer arrived, he was very pleasant and stood silently in the backyard  as the other officer unsuccessfully attempted to calm the yelling man down.    He then spoke to the out of control man, he wasn’t loud or threatening but he was firm.  It seemed to work.

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There is a different approach, a different tone used by officers in  lower income areas. Some of the officers are aggressive and often disrespectful to members of the community.  As a result, members of that community are often hostile to the officers.

There are some officers who are intimidated by people of color. Some are predisposed to believe they will face hostility in these neighborhoods.  Its not uncommon to see police officers with the guns drawn in these neighborhoods, in front of women and children.

If your a resident of an upper middle income neighborhoods, you cant relate to citizens in lower middle class neighborhood.   You may even assume  those people are predisposed to violence and perhaps the police are justified in their actions.

If you live in a low or middle income community. If you haven’t experienced an negative interaction with law enforcement, there is a good chance you’ve heard or know someone who has.

 Adding fuel to the mistrust of police officers are the constant reports of unarmed black ,latino and poor whites being shot and killed by the police.

There some white officers who fear or mistrust people of color.   The tone and body language is aggressive.  In Sacramento, the makeup of the police and sheriff departments do not reflect the community they serve.

  Also missing is education, people often fear the things and people they don’t understand.  Members of nearly all police department across the country. Could benefit from education about various minority groups.  For example, many groups, cultures, talk loudly and aggressively. For some, outside the culture may find this intimidating.

One would think with multi million dollar payouts to citizens.  Cities leaders would be actively looking for a solution.  But this isn’t happening.    Most cities are reactive, putting out destructive wild fires.   Community meeting are short lived, fading within months.

Change is difficult, our world is changing, a compromised is needed.  But the tone has to change. It is in the best interest of the cities to encourage and support ongoing dialogue bridging not only in law enforcement and the people they serve but cities leadership. As there are some elected officials who are out of touch with segments of their community.

EVERY member of law enforcement (not just department heads) should be required to attend an community meeting twice a year to meet interested citizens.  Public Notices of these meetings should be in all forms of  media to encourage participation.

Yes, there is a cost to this.  The City of Sacramento and other cities across the country pay over a billion dollars a year settling claims and the amount are increasing each year.

Law enforcement agencies throughout the country are struggling.  Some cities are struggling to recruit officers. Others are struggling to retain officers.  Many officers and police unions believe they’re being asked too much and  feel they are under attack.

The solution is daunting.

CityFella