Hanging on to HIS Mercedes


Just another day on Florida’s I-95

Image result for junior francis florida

Love is 4 EVA, until it isn’t! 

When Junior Francis and Patresha Isidore bought their C class, they knew their love was forever, after all they share a daughter.   Forever meant a joint title.

On Sunday, forever wasn’t home.  Patresha message was simple  my car, MY car, MY CAR, talkin bout MY CARR.

Men are very attached to their wheels and Junior Francis attached himself to the hood of the Mercedes.

With his former Boo inside the car and him outside the car,there wasn’t much  of a real meeting of the minds.

Petresha wasn’t feeling a chat anyway as she drove through the streets of Lauderhill Florida with her Boo on the hood their car.

She couldn’t shake Junior on the streets, so she headed to Interstate 95.  With Junior on the hood, Petresha qualified for the Express Lane, where baby girl was going to see how aerodynamic Junior was.

Junior was some kinda man. As his baby mama was trying to knock him off the car. Home cheese was holding on with one hand and calling 911 with the other,telling the police operator that his baby mama was “swerving the car and he was on top of the car.” I really need help.” 

His nineteen mile terror ride ended at an intersection, where they intercepted by Broward County Sheriff’s Office deputies.

The Sheriffs department said Patresha Isidore   had “multiple opportunities” to stop the car and call 911 and willfully put her baby daddy in danger.

Francis, didn’t want to prosecute his ex , because they have a five-year-old daughter. and refused to provide a sworn recorded statement.  But she was arrested and charged with negligence (risk injury or death) .    Patresha,bonded out of custody on the misdemeanor charge.

The Mercedes is now, his car, His car, His CARR ! They talking about his carr.

It’s clear, they haven’t watched Judge Judy.   Never, evah, evah, EVAH, share a bank account, co-sign, or buy a car with someone until your married.   The future of the Mercedes is in question.  Someone will have to buy someone out.

*This was a dramatization for my pleasure.  I’m in Sacramento and they are in South Florida.

CityFella

 

 

 

 

 

 

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How I tackled life in Sweden as an Indian woman


 How I tackled life in Sweden as an Indian woman

 Vanitha Durai explains how she managed to get Indian women in Gothenburg to form a strong online community.

MY SWEDISH CAREER: The Local speaks with Vanitha Durai, an Indian Volvo Cars worker in Gothenburg who started a popular community for Indian women in Gothenburg.

From: The Local Sweden

So what do you do when you arrive in a foreign city and find yourself convinced that you’re not the only Indian housewife struggling to find something to do?

Well, if you’re Vanitha Durai, you simply create the group that you want to join.

And so the Indian Women in Gothenburg community was born, an online group that has flourished and now  hosts all kinds of events for its community of hundreds.

“I felt the need for a small group to discuss the difficulties of moving here, things like not having a job, or what it’s like to follow a spouse to Sweden,” she tells The Local.

“At first it was a kind of recreational thing, but then we started thinking how to expand it, and soon it became a place for people to find job-finding help, to have discussions, and to find things for their children.”

The group has since hosted events for Diwali Day, which marks the culmination of the week-long Hindu festival of lights, and summer camps for children.

Most recently, the group has hosted a flashmob event in a Gothenburg mall.

“The point of the flashmob was to celebrate the beauty of womanhood. Half of the women aren’t trained dancers, it was more a matter of accepting who we all are and sharing positive vibes,” she says.

Finding work for herself was another challenge that the 34-year-old tackled, eventually landing a job in business management with Volvo Cars.

Now in her fifth year in Sweden, Durai admits that it’s rarely an easy path when you’re looking for a career in Sweden.

“Of course you have a barrier with the language, that’s the main thing, and that isn’t helped that there aren’t many job opportunities,” she says.

“I think the main thing is you need to know a little bit of Swedish, enough to understand what’s going on, then also enough to express yourself in a way that people can understand.”

But her main tip, she says, is to really make the most of any interview opportunities.

“The interview is the place where you can really prove yourself. You have to use that opportunity to the fullest to prove that you can really do even more than what’s shown on your CV,” she says.

Of course, you have to adapt to life in Sweden too – which was an easy step for Durai, who originally hails form Chennai in southern India – some 7,500 kilometres from Gothenburg.

“The job culture is very welcoming here, but you have to get in – the entry part is the toughest step,” she says.

“But Sweden is a very good place to live and to bring up kids. The benefits are excellent and it’s a safe environment for the family.”

Indeed, the value placed on family life in Sweden is one of the things Durai highlights about Sweden in general.

“I feel the quality of life is good, you get a lot of time with the family, evenings, weekends, there is no pressure – you have your vacation,” she says.

White women like me, we need to talk (about not calling the police)


(CNN)   Did you hear about the white woman who called police in Memphis earlier this month because a black man who wanted to buy a house was trying to take a look at it first? What about the white people who called the police on black people simply for sleeping in their own dorm lounge at Yale, barbecuing at a park, shopping at Nordstrom Rack, waiting in a Starbucksor … the list goes tragically on and on.

Kristin Rowe-Finkbeiner

White women like me, we need to have a talk. Enough is enough and we need to make ourselves part of the solution. You. Me. The woman next to you in the grocery store line, at the bus stop or on the soccer field. The writing is on the wall. We’ve got to stand up and speak out because right now, we’re part of the problem.
Click on the Link Below for the Rest of the Story

make kenye west BLACK again


Related image

You can actually purchase this hat online.  There are “Make Kanye Great Again” Tee shirts. 

That’s America!  

I love that tweet. ” Make Kanye Black Again”

Kenya is a proud black man.

Kanye West is an American Citizen first and performer second.  As a citizen, he is free to join any political party he chooses.    However as a citizen and a performer, he risks alienating his fan base.

His support of President Trump is curious.  Many years ago Mr West called then President George W. Bush  racist, due  on his lack of support for the Katrina victims in New Orleans.  When President Trump and his father has a long history of discrimination against blacks and other minorities and there lies the outrage.

I agree with Chance the Rapper, when he says “Black people don’t have to be Democrats “  I think some of his fans  might forgive Kanye should he chooses to become a Republican.

The outrage is the support of an individual who’s has supported white supremacists, reportedly called African Nations shithole nations and systematically dismantling existing programs that effect  LGBT communities and People of Color.

 

 

 

 

 

I’ve never been a fan of Kanye West his talent is undeniable, I struggle with his narcissism , much like the narcissism of our President. However while I don’t agree with his admiration of Donald Trump, I admire his courage.   A few years ago I admired the courage of the Dixie Chicks.  You remember the Dixie Chicks.  Google um.

Who knows, Pandora?  Kanye West

CityFella

Michael Steele’s Treatment at CPAC Is a Sad and Worrisome Omen for the GOP


Minority voters are watching how conservatives treat my old boss, the former RNC Chair.

By: Doug Heye-Daily Beast

The news that former RNC Chairman Michael Steele was criticized on the stage of the Conservative Political Action Committee should not have been a surprise. For 15 years, Steele has had his race used against him, with the bipartisan critics and the media often amplifying the notion that he has to be kept  in his “place.”

I know first hand, having worked on Michael Steele’s 2006 Senate race and at the Republican National Committee while Steele was chairman. But while I had come to expect it from his liberal opponents, I’m distressed to see the “conservative” movement echo these lines.

It began back in the 2002 Maryland Gubernatorial race, when Steele was candidate for lieutenant governor. The liberal editorial page of the Baltimore Sun questioned Steele’s credentials, saying he brought “little to the team but the color of his skin.” Four years later, the Sun was at it again, patronizingly terming Steele a “likable man and persuasive speaker” – articulate and clean, anyone?

Steny Hoyer, the House Minority Whip has called Steele “slavish”—for which he had to apologize— while Maryland State Senate President Mike Miller called Steele “Uncle Tom.” The Democratic National Committee, in a 37-page memo by Cornell Belcher sought to “turn Steele into a typical Republican candidate — as opposed to an African-American.”

When Steele ran, successfully, for RNC chair in 2009, the dirt continued to be thrown at him. In 2009, MSNBC’s Joe Scarborough declared that “Republicans are learning right now, that sometimes being black isn’t enough. They thought ‘we’re going to get a black guy to run our party.’”

Always outspoken, but also a former seminarian, Steele handled this with a characteristic mix of class and combativeness. But even as he was able to deal the slings and arrows coming his way, the comments raised serious questions about how much of the political universe views race.

With the communications director of CPAC declaring, from the stage this past week, that Steele was elected as RNC chair “because he’s a black guy,” it raises even more serious questions about how Trumpian tribalism has quickly become the rule of law within a large segment of the GOP.

This is terrible for our party.

While Republicans may see speaking to minority audiences as a low priority, they should realize that minorities are closely watching them. For African-Americans to see the man who is likely the most prominent African-American Republican on the airwaves, treated this way, is another sign of a Republican Party that is not interested in winning their votes. CPAC is an event I used to attend nearly annually but have not in several years. Over time, the conference has taken more and more of a tribal posture, seeking to cast out what it decides are “bad” conservatives in favor of “good” conservatives with a roster slouching towards the extreme. Last year it was Milo Yiannopoulos, who was ultimate disinvited from CPAC after sponsors balked. This year, it was Marion Le Pen of France’s National Front, whose politics are so controversial in her home country that French rocker Johnny Hallyday had the family banned from the funeral. Unlike Yiannopoulos, Le Pen was not disinvited. Instead, she was welcomed as a hero, if not the conquering one.

Of course, CPAC’s conquering hero is clearly Donald Trump. Just two years after canceling his 2016 speech under the threat of a walk out, Trump has become the belle of the ball, fully in control of an adoring audience all too happy to boo Senator John McCain and other Republicans who don’t sufficiently grovel to him.

Does anyone honestly believe that these comments would have been said about Steele had he been a Trump acolytes instead of a detractor? The obvious and honest answer is no. That may be fine if Trump is enjoying high popularity. But he is not. He is in a politically tenuous position—with low popularity ratings and an ever-encroaching Russia investigation—not the position of power.

All of which puts the GOP in precisely the position many believed the party was heading the day before Trump’s surprise election. It also means that whenever Trump is no longer president, the GOP will still be divided, with limited desire or effort to appeal to minorities, and no road map forward.

They will need—and should want—people like Michael Steele to help move beyond these kinds of moments and re-find their way.

 

 

Ikea: black Swede is not a fit for the Greek Market?


Swedish actor told he 'can't be black' for Ikea advert
Photo: Private
 From: The Local Sweden
UPDATED: A Swedish actor has complained of discrimination after he was told he “can’t be black for the Greek market”, in an e-mail rejecting him for a role in an Ikea advert. But the casting company says he was put forward for the job.
Fernando, a Stockholm-based stand-up comedian and actor, was cc’d on an e-mail from the flat-park furniture giant’s UK-based casting company to his Stockholm agent. 
Fernando said Ikea’s press office had been understanding.
“He can’t be black for the Greek market Sorry,” the e-mail read.
“I was sad and angry,” Fernando, who doesn’t want his surname published, told The Local after SVT first broke the story. “It’s common that these things happen, saying it to your face, but not actually to get it in an e-mail.”
But Tracie Saban, one of the owners of the casting company, Crocodile Casting, said that Fernando was in fact put forward for the job, along with another black actor and an Arab man despite not fitting the brief, “just to expand it a bit”.
“We saw his video upload and put it on our link which we sent to our client,” she said. “He knew he was put forward for the job, so for him to say that is a lie. Nobody got the job. It was cancelled in the end because of script changes.”
In early November, Ikea began looking for Swedish actors who could star in an advert to be broadcast in Greece before November 24th, the date of the so-called “Black Friday” shopping festival. 
“The actor needs to be really good at comedy, with a dry sense of humor,” the brief read next to a link to the Youtube video below.

Although the brief seemed to specify a white person who would suggest a more stereotypical image of “Sweden” to a Greek audience, Fernando thought he met enough of the requirements to apply. 
“I said, so I’m a stand-up comedian, and I sent a link to them of my showreel,” he said.
A day later, Fernando was included in the e-mail to his agents.
Saban denies his claims that Crocodile casting was “not polite” when Fernando rung to complain.
“My partner was almost in tears. She spoke to him for an hour on the phone,” she said. “He got his apology on bended knees. We felt so bad that he felt that that was a racist comment. It wasn’t at all, it didn’t come from any bad place in our heart, because we’re not like that.”
She said that after the phone conversation and an e-mail of apology, Fernando had seemed happy until he went public three months later.
Ikea told SVT that the company had indeed included skin-color suggestions in the brief for the advert.
“Sometimes you are looking for a blond man. Sometimes you are looking for a dark-haired woman, an Asian one or a South American,” Jakob Holmström, the company’s press spokesman, explained.
“There’s nothing unusual about that in itself. What’s unfortunate is the way this was formulated when he got a rejection.”
Fernando’s agent Fia Hammarström, who is part-Thai, said she was considering dropping Fernando for going public with his complaint.
“This will hurt other people in the agency as well,” she said. “I have 42 people in my agency and I know how the casting companies work, and they will be afraid to take him in.”
Saban said her and her partner were upset at the way “a very snappy e-mail with bad grammar” had been used to stir up a media controversy.
It’s been misconstrued and exaggerated to make us look like racist casting directors, which we’re not because we push for all inclusive casting all the time, especially in this country, we’re always saying ‘can we bring multi-ethnic people in?’.”
She said this even applied to the Greek market. “We’ve done loads of commercials for Greece where we cast black actors,” she said.
Fernando said Ikea’s press office had been very understanding, but he had wanted to speak out because he found it frustrating that advertisers and drama producers in Sweden so rarely cast black actors in ordinary roles. 
“They say they want a Swedish actor, and I came here when I was six years old, so I don’t know what more I can do to be Swedish,” he said. “It’s 2018, we are living in a multicultural country. So what is a Swedish actor? Is it a white actor?”
But it has also won plaudits for adverts which break down stereotypes and prejudices. 
Its Hooray! To the Wonderful Everyday advert, which came out last November, was praised by Michelle de Leon, the founder of World Afro Day, which celebrates wild afro hairstyles, because it “shows a black family and their curly, kinky, afro hair, living the good life”. 
She wrote in The Guardian that the advert had been the first that made her and her daughter “feel good to be black and British”.
“If this is a watershed moment, it’s been a long time coming,” she said.
Here’s a video of Fernando made by his agent, Hammarstrom.