Marsha! Marsha! MARSHA! Maureen McCormick ‘lucky’ to be alive after years of drug abuse


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She’s been on the straight and narrow for 35 years, but getting there wasn’t easy.

In an ET Online interview released on Thursday, Maureen McCormick said she’s “lucky to be alive” after struggling with addiction for several years.

“I am so lucky to be here, alive, and I feel like my mind is still really good. I feel very very lucky that I came out of it,” she said.

McCormick, 61, told the publication she struggled with substance abuse for “six, seven years,” hitting “quite a few low points.

According to her interview with ET Online, husband Michael Cummings was instrumental in helping her kick her bad habits.

“When we first got together, I was still dabbling, and he said, ‘You know, it’s either me or that, take it or I’m out of here,'” she recalled. “And I realized that I didn’t want to lose one of the greatest things I had ever found.”

Although she said “life has never been so good,” as it is after she got sober, she’s still dealing with a great deal of guilt from her addiction. McCormick said most of that stems from the pain she caused her parents during their lifetime.

“I remember my father saying that he was going to turn me into the police…I wish I could take back all the pain that I caused them,” she said.

McCormick’s journey toward sobriety was a long one, which she spoke about at length in her tell all book, “Here’s The Story: Surviving Marcia Brady and Finding My True Voice.”

The “Brady Bunch” actress who starred as Marcia Brady admits in a new memoir she was a cocaine fiend who swapped sex for drugs, partied at the Playboy Mansion and bedded screen sibling Grey Brady.

“I sought refuge in seemingly glamorous cocaine dens above Hollywood. I thought I would find answers there, while in reality I was simply running farther from myself. From there, I spiraled downward on a path of self-destruction that cost me my career and very nearly my life,” she wrote.

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Sacramento: The Best Place to Stay when you want to get your Party On!


 

 Long lines down 15th waiting to enter Midtown’s “Ultra Lounge

18 Blocks Long (10th to 28th)

5 blocks wide (I to Capitol)

Its the weekend, and your looking for grown up entertainment, in most cities San Francisco, Atlanta, Los Angeles, Portland if you want to change to a different venue say classical to rock.  It means you must drive across town.

In midtown Sacramento, Moroccan Belly Dancers are a block from LGBT dance clubs, a block from Beer Gardens, Live Rock Venues, Country, Sports Bars, Cigar Bars, Wine Tasting Rooms  Blues Clubs. and Restaurants.

Sacramento?

The Best Place to Stay in And Get your party on?

Residence Inn Capitol Park


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The Residence Inn Capital Park is the ONLY hotel in Sacramento that has six restaurants, two dance clubs and four bars on the same block!  

If you have a fear of crossing streets this is your place in Sactown!

 The hotel has its own a bar and grill called ” The HOTEL Bar .  

You literally do not have to leave the block!

Should you cross the street…..

There are nine more restaurants and two of dance clubs and of course the State Capitol

The Ultra Lounge is directly Across the Streets as is Cafeteria 15L

.

Drink and Ride

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Sactown’s Midtown is lively, surprising, with a variety of restaurants and venues. Park you car, you’ll find something in Midtown.

Note: This is not a paid advertisement for the Residence Inn Capitol Park.

 

Don’t Do It!


We know Common Sense is anything but common.

Somepeople, (lets hope they aren’t anyone you know)  have appeared as clowns at movie theaters all over the world dressed as clowns. 

Listen, my screaming began as I was buying the ticket.  Being the manly man I am,  I continued to scream throughout the movie.  Last week, if someone sat next to me wearing a clown suite.  They may have entered the theater looking like Pennywise however, they would have looked like someone else when they left. . 

Say Ivanka Trump!

 A twitter user has shared a terrifying photo of a clown who gatecrashed a screening of It

From the UK Sun 
NO LAUGHING MATTER

People dressed as clowns have been lurking in cinemas to see It… and viewers are freaking out

It villain Pennywise is an iconic horror character who has started to become too real for comfort for some people

That’s because a handful of jokers have decided that the horror film would be more enjoyable to watch if they went along to the cinema in full clown gear.

Naturally, this has led to some terrifying encounters in dark cinemas, where It fans have unexpectedly come face-to-face with the nightmare villain.

Taking to Twitter, a man going by the name of Chris spooked out fellow horror fanatics when he shared a picture of what was waiting for him inside the cinema.

 

 

CityFella (still screaming)

Seven reasons autumn is the best time to visit Italy


Seven reasons autumn is the best time to visit Italy
Beautiful sunsets and empty streets: That’s autumnn in Rome. Photo: Moyan Brenn/Flickr
It’s never a bad time for an Italian holiday, but autumn is when the country really comes into its own. Read on for the top reasons you should book a trip here now.

1. The Colors


Autumn by Lake Como. Photo: rglinsky/Depositphotos

Whether it’s the autumn sunshine illuminating reddish city buildings, the changing hues of leaves in the countryside, or glistening reflections in one of the country’s many amazing lakes, autumn is surely the most beautiful time to spend in Italy. Instagrammers rejoice: no filter needed here!

 

2. Streets to yourself

Get to see Castel Sant’Angelo without the hordes.. Photo: pio3/Depositphotos

Italy is a popular choice for summer holidays, so between May and September the city centres swell with tourists. This means it’s harder to find a quiet table at restaurants; hotels, airlines and train companies hike their prices; and queues for the most famous tourist attractions can reach ridiculous lengths.

With autumn finally here you can breathe a sigh of relief and enjoy having the streets to yourself. You’ll also get a more ‘authentic’ sense of Italy, as most Italians leave the cities during the summer months – meaning many local businesses and eateries close down during peak season too.

3. Food festivals

Autumn is the best time to visit your local market. Photo: davidewingphoto/Depositphotos

Autumn means harvest time, and in Italy that means plenty of regional festivals celebrating the local dishes. It’s a perfect time to explore nearby towns, with many of them hosting a sagra (food festival) to celebrate – and eat! – their truffles, chestnuts, pasta sauce, figs and mushrooms.

Look out for the white truffle festival on October weekends in Alba, Piedmont; the aubergine sagra in Savona; and the limoncello festival in Massa Lubrense. For travellers with a sweet tooth, time your visit to coincide with the massive Eurochocolate fair in Perugia in mid-October or Cremona’s nougat fest. Those are just a few of the options, so make sure to check out what’s happening near you.

Even if you can’t make it to a local sagra, the variety of fresh vegetables available at local markets, and the smell of chestnuts as sellers roast them on the streets, make Italian autumn a foodie paradise. Many restaurants will serve seasonal specials, so make sure to ask your waiter what they recommend.

4. Wine time

The Italian wine harvest. Photo: tepic/Depositphotos

After all that food, you’ll need something to wash it down – and luckily it’s the wine season, with harvesting taking place in each of Italy’s 20 regions. If you can’t make it out to the vineyards, you can visit any one of the many towns and villages that host grape festivals (Sagra dell’uva), and taste world-class Italian wines.

Olive harvesting takes place around the same time, so if you prefer you can also experience the first stage of another Italian speciality: extra virgin olive oil.

5. Breathing space at the beaches

This is Sperlonga beach near Rome – in November. Photo: Catherine Edwards/The Local

The combination of tourists going home and locals deciding it’s far too cold for beach weather makes autumn an ideal time for a coastal excursion. No longer will you have to battle for a sunbed or a spot to place your towel, or deal with hiked-up prices for deckchair rental and gelato. You may even find you get the beach to yourself.

6. Autumn weather

Tuscan sunrise. Photo: sborisov/Depositphotos

Speaking of which, Italian autumn is altogether a much more pleasant season for those who find Italy’s sweltering summers tough to bear.\

After months where anything other than taking a long siesta and eating ice cream in piazzas seems far too taxing, the cooler – but usually still sunny – autumn means you can finally go on long walks, sightseeing afternoons and explore all that Italy has to offer without having to stop for a drink of water in a shaded area every few minutes.

7. Culture overload

The autumn months are the perfect time to get dressed up for a show. Photo: wulfman65/Depositphotos

Theatres are generally closed in Italy over summer, but the cooler months see theatre and opera seasons kick off again, so even on rainy days you won’t get bored.

High profile events taking place over autumn include the Rome Film Festival and Montecatini Opera Festival in central Italy, while Bologna’s Jazz Festival is well worth a trip to the north of the country. There are also plenty of smaller festivals on across the peninsular, from the mainstream to the niche; for example, the Siena Palios are over for the year, but you’ve still got time to plan a trip to the annual Donkey Palio in Cuneo.

 

The Local

Swiss hotel sparks outrage by asking Jewish guests to shower before swimming


Swiss hotel sparks outrage by asking Jewish guests to shower before swimming

Arosa. Photo: Stephen Colebourne/Flickr

Visitors to Arosa’s Aparthaus Paradies shocked to discover anti-Semitic notices, which have now been removed

A sign put up at a Swiss hotel calling on Jewish guests to shower before going swimming (Courtesy)
Last month, a hotel in Switzerland put up signs telling “Jewish guests” to shower before swimming, sparking outrage from the guests.

Another sign, this one on the refrigerator, said: “For our Jewish guests: You may access the refrigerator only in the following hours: 10:00-11:00 and 16:30-17:30. I hope you understand that our team does not like being disturbed all the time.”

While guests said they were horrified by the signs and Deputy Foreign Minister Tzipi Hotovely in a statement expressed her outrage at the situation, the hotel said it was a misunderstanding and there was no anti-Semitic intent at all.

“It was very strange and the sort of anti-Semitic incident we have not been exposed to before,” she said.“Everyone had been very nice to us; suddenly we came down and saw the sign, we were in shock,”

Hotovely called the incident “an anti-Semitic act of the worst and ugliest kind.”

Hotovely also said she had spoken with Israel’s ambassador to Switzerland, Jacob Keidar, who confirmed that the signs had been removed. The ambassador said he had spoken with the Swiss Foreign Ministry about the incident.

Hotovely said that removing the signs was not sufficient. “Unfortunately, anti-Semitism in Europe is still a reality and we must make sure that the punishment for incidents such as these will serve as deterrents for those who still harbor the germ of anti-Semitism,” she said.

 Ruth Thomann, the manager of the hotel, confirmed the signs had now been removed. She insisted that many Jews visit the hotel, particularly at this time of year, and they are very welcome.

The hotel was popular with ultra-Orthodox Jewish guests from around the world because it was usually very accommodating to their needs.

The hotel managements said, it meant no harm by the signs. “There was no anti-Semitic intent and the signs were removed,” it said. “We have no problem with Jewish guests at the hotel.”

The hotel explained why, it said, the signs related specifically to Jews.

“The sign on the freezer was hung because only Jews used the workers’ refrigerator,” it said. “The sign regarding the showers was hung after two Jewish girls entered without taking a shower, ignoring a sign addressed to all guests. Therefore, a specific sign was hung to focus their attention on this.”

He Urinated on the Deputy


 

Placer County Deputies noticed ,Sacramento resident, Steven Holley was acting strangely around the Miners Ravine Natures Preserve in Granite Bay on Thursday..

In a short struggle with the deputies, the 55 year old’s dingy sprung a leak and he urinated on the Deputy.

The Deputies found methamphetamine and drug paraphernalia, on the moist suspect.

Perhaps, Holley will used the patent”I was looking for a rest room and how did those get in there?”defense.

CityFella

 

Are natural disasters part of God’s retribution?


Image result for hurricane irma

Roman Catholic Theologian examines the idea that natural disasters are divine punishment

By: Matthew Schmatz/The Conversation

This piece originally appeared on The Conversation

Seeing the devastation of Hurricane Harvey, conservative Christian pastor John McTernan argued recently that “God is systematically destroying America” out of anger over “the homosexual agenda.”

There were others who disagreed over the reasons for God’s anger, but not necessarily with the assumption that God can be wrathful. Ann Coulter, a conservative political commentator, for example, said jokingly that Houston’s election of a lesbian mayor was a more “credible” cause of the hurricane than global warming. And, from the other side of the political spectrum, a Tampa University professor tweeted that God had punished Texans for voting Republican. He subsequently expressed regret, but was fired.

It is true that many religious traditions, including Judaism and Christianity, have seen natural disasters as divine punishment. But, as a scholar of religion, I would argue that things aren’t that simple.

The Genesis flood

Some of the earliest narratives of divine retribution go back to 2000 B.C. The Sumerian Epic of Gilgamesh tells the story of a catastrophic flood.

The gods decide to bring rain down to end the “uproar” of humankind. But the god of the waters, Enki, warns the righteous man, Utnapishtim, about the impending disaster.

Utnapishtim saves himself and his family by constructing a boat.

Elements of this story are later echoed in the Hebrew Bible’s Book of Genesis. God is angry because the Earth is filled with violence caused by human beings and vows to “destroy both them and the Earth.”
Noah is a “blameless” man, and God tells him to build an ark that would be large enough to hold his family and “two of all living creatures.” Although humanity perishes in a deluge, Noah preserves life on Earth.

It might seem straightforward to say that floods in the Bible are associated with God’s anger, but that means missing the complexity of the text.

In the Genesis account, after the waters subside, God makes a covenant with Noah:

“Never again will I destroy all living creatures.”

This promise not to destroy humankind is also referred to in the Book of Isaiah, the Israelite prophet and seer. In a vision, God says that just as he vowed to Noah that water “would never again cover the Earth,” so too he promises not “to be angry.”

Biblical approaches to suffering

The question of God’s anger is intimately connected to the problem of human suffering. After all, how can a loving God cause indiscriminate human misery?

We first need to look at how suffering is portrayed in the texts. For example, it is also in the Book of Isaiah that we find the story of the “Man of Sorrows” – a man who takes on the sufferings of others and is an image of piety.

While the Bible does speak of humans suffering because of their sins, some of the most moving passages speak about how innocent people suffer as well.

The Book of Job relates the story of a “blameless and upright man,” Job, whom Satan causes to experience all sorts of calamities. The suffering becomes so intense that Job wishes he had never been born. God then speaks from the heavens and explains to Job that God’s ways surpass human understanding.

The Hebrew Bible recognizes that people suffer often through no fault of their own. Most famously, Psalm 42 is an extended lament about suffering that nonetheless concludes by praising God.

The Hebrew Bible’s views on suffering cannot be encapsulated by a single message. Sometimes suffering is caused by God, sometimes by Satan and sometimes by other human beings. But sometimes the purpose behind suffering remains hidden.

The Christian tradition also provides diverse answers to the issue of suffering.

The New Testament does refer to the Genesis flood when talking about God punishing human beings. For example, Paul the Apostle observes that God brought the flood on “the ungodly” people of the world.

But the Epistle of James, a letter in the New Testament often attributed to Jesus’ brother or stepbrother, says that God tests no one. In fact, those who endure trials are eventually rewarded. The early Christian philosopher Origen argued that through suffering we can understand our own weaknesses and dependence on God.

In these views, suffering is not punishment but something that draws human beings to closer God and to one another.

Moving to more contemporary reflections, philosopher Dewi Zephaniah Phillips argues that it is mistaken to attribute to God a human feeling like anger because God lies beyond human reality.

Believing that Hurricane Harvey is “God’s punishment,” reduces the divine to human terms.

God is merciful

Some theologians totally reject the idea of suffering as divine retribution because such an act would be unworthy of a merciful God. From a Christian perspective, God also suffered by being crucified on the cross as Jesus Christ.

And so, as a Roman Catholic scholar, I would argue that God suffers with people in Houston – as well as in Mumbai, which experienced much more extensive flooding recently.

In the words of German theologian Jurgen Moltmann,

“God heals the sicknesses and the griefs by making the sicknesses and the griefs his suffering and his grief.”

So, instead of dwelling on God’s wrath, we need to understand God’s kindness and mercy. And that, in times of crises and distress, it is kindness and mercy that require us to reach out to those who need comfort and assistance.

Mathew Schmalz, Associate Professor of Religion, College of the Holy Cross