Racism shouldn’t make people uncomfortable in Oklahoma?


Greenwood,Oklahoma

For two days , May 31 and June 1, 1921, mobs of White residents, many of them deputized and given weapons by city officials, attacked Black residents and businesses of the Greenwood District in Tulsa, Oklahoma.  As many as 300 African Americans lost their lives and more than 9,000 were left homeless when the small town was attacked, looted and literally burned to the ground. Greenwood, was a very prosperous area which was affectionately known as “Black Wall Street.”

A new state law HB1773 will soon bar educators from requiring courses or teaching concepts that cause any individual to “feel discomfort, guilt, anguish or any other form of psychological distress” due to their race or gender. While similar measures have been debated or passed in other Republican-dominated states, Oklahoma’s take on “critical race theory” is adding fresh tension to Tulsa’s plans to mark the massacre’s upcoming centennial.

After 30 Years, We Still Owe Elaine From ‘Seinfeld’ So Much


For better or worse, Julia Louis-Dreyfus’s character was one of the first truly multifaceted TV heroines.

How Elaine Benes Made Awkwardness Cool

By: Farah Joan Fard

It was July 5, 1989—when a TV show about nothing introduced America to one of the greatest female characters in sitcom history. Initially written as The Seinfeld Chronicles with a group of all-male leads, the show was picked up for production with the caveat that its creators, Jerry Seinfeld and Larry David, include a woman among the main characters. And so Julia Louis-Dreyfus as Elaine Benes danced across our screen in the still-hilarious-after-all-these-years Seinfeld.

While shows like That Girl, Mary Tyler Moore, and Murphy Brown paved the way for independent women characters on television, Elaine moved the ball forward in a different sense. Sure, she was beautiful and smart. But she was also problematic, imperfect, and unshakably outspoken even when she wasn’t one hundred percent sure about something. She had a soft spot for highfalutin art-house films and Greenpeace, but was uncouth and indelicate in the way that women actually are. Stopping for candy rather than rushing to meet her boyfriend at the hospital? Mary Tyler Moore would never! In short, Elaine was compelling because of a character trait that we now take for granted: She was unapologetic about the kind of self-centered behavior usually reserved for TV’s male players.

Elaine Benes, TV’s ur-antiheroine and a questionable role model, laid down the foundation for characters like Liz Lemon of 30 Rock, Robin Sherbatsky of How I Met Your Mother, and Annie of Shrill—women who are occasionally unkempt or annoying, who refuse to fit into the societal norms represented elsewhere on TV, and who, as a result, are sometimes painfully relatable.

So, in celebration of 30 years of Get! Out!s and pleas for a spare square, we ID’d five ways in which Elaine Benes completely changed the landscape for women on television. We owe her much. Or, as she might put it, “Here’s to those who wish us well, and those who don’t can go to hell.”

She Proved Being Bossy Isn’t Bad

Elaine’s pushiness, both physically and socially, is rumored to have been based on a friend and ex-girlfriend of Seinfeld’s. Elaine yells, she shoves, she towers as much as a person of 5’3” stature can. Her boyfriend, Puddy, calls her bossy. At one point, Jason Alexander’s George confesses that he’s scared of her. At the end of the notorious episode “The Little Kicks,” George’s father challenges her with a, “You want a piece of me?” She replies, “I could drop you like a bag of dirt,” and the scene ends on a freeze-frame of her swinging a punch

That Elaine Benes was the biggest boss of the friend group, yet bossiness remained peripheral to her character, just shows how truly badass she was. She was multidimensional—and some of those dimensions were intimidating!

Now, of course, tons of female characters stand up for themselves without making it some sort of heroic character arc. Monica Geller (Courtney Cox) on Friends, which hit TV screens in 1994, was the most intimidating character in the main cast, and her noted physical strength notoriously surpassed her male counterparts. In multiple episodes, Monica wrestles her brother, Ross, and it’s implied she beats her friend-turned-paramour Chandler at arm wrestling at least once (“The One with the Halloween Party”). Monica is a powerhouse, but it adds to (rather than contradict) her femininity and she’s not on some crusade.

The fact that they could have some magnificent traits and some downright detestable ones is a testament to how well they were written.

Later, the introduction of Robin Scherbatsky (Cobie Smulders) on How I Met Your Mother could have filled the generic, pretty girlfriend role. Instead, Robin possesses far more traits formerly given to stereotypical male characters in group comedies (and she’s far more convincing at it than Neil Patrick Harris’s unnecessarily sexual conquest-obsessed Barney Stinson): She smokes cigars, she loves guns, she puts her career first, and she doesn’t shy away from a bar brawl.

When Elaine throws a punch or Robin throws a barstool, it’s not set up as a uncharacteristically heroic gesture of a nice lady turned Wonder Woman—it tracks with their whole personality. Some of their qualities are even worth criticizing—Robin could be staunchly anti-other women, and who likes guns?! But the fact that these female characters could have some magnificent traits and some detestable ones simultaneously is a testament to how well they were written.

She Talked About Abortion on TV

In 1972, a year before Roe passed, the sitcom Maude—a spinoff of All in the Family—introduced an abortion storyline to its progressive titular character in “Maude’s Dilemma.” The episode was nearly yanked off the air. And, almost 50 years later, the topic is still considered bold for television (though this is slowly changing). But Maude’s abortion arc was treated with intensity and seriousness. On the contrary, Elaine’s argument is, though staunchly pro-choice, still goofy and slightly absurdist. (Part of the difference may be that Maude’s was about a main character choosing whether to get an abortion, and Seinfeld’s handling of the issue keeps it in the realm of the hypothetical, which makes it easier to joke about.) As Kramer later ends up shouting, “It’s not pizza until it comes out of the oven!”

In this year’s Shrill, the Aidy Bryant–led Hulu series based on Lindy West’s book of the same name, abortion is more of an inconvenience than a tragedy. It’s a key distinction that shows just how far we’ve come: In Seinfeld, abortion is brought up as nonchalantly as muffins or soup; Shrill kicks it up a notch, keeping our gaze with Bryant’s Annie as she undergoes the procedure. We hear the doctor narrating what’s going on so that Annie is aware of the process. She’s not distraught about or guilty for her decision. And yet, when her sometimes-boyfriend’s reaction to her choice is his own relief, Annie doesn’t let him off the hook—she points out that having a baby would have trapped him into “treating [her] like a human being.” Advertisement – Continue Reading Below

It’s a brilliant, nuanced take on abortion, and it’s possible that we would not be here, culturally, without characters like Elaine shouting her views from the rooftops.

She Was an Unapologetically Child-Free Woman

In a very ‘90s-TV-show turn of events, Elaine gets upset about her unmarried status when George gets engaged (“The Postponement”), but Seinfeld never focused Elaine’s story on trying to get a husband or have kids. In the episode “The Soul Mate,” Elaine sits among her female friends who pressure her to move to Long Island and “have a baby already,” as they’ve all done. Elaine’s defense: Why should she?

Suit, Formal wear, White-collar worker, Standing, Tuxedo, Businessperson, Gesture, Smile, Outerwear, Business,

Getty Images

It was refreshing to have a female character proudly confirm that she doesn’t need to have kids to be a complete and happy woman, especially because so many shows before and since have struggled with the topic. But while many characters are as wedding-obsessed as Jennifer Aniston’s Rachel Green on Friends (to whom we are literally introduced while wearing a wedding gown), there are occasionally those as proudly anti-kid as Samantha Jones, who even throws herself an I’m Not Having a Baby Shower.

She defied many of the labels so often lobbed at women who do what they want.

Advertisement – Continue Reading Below

Our society still stigmatizes and continues to ignore women when they say they don’t want to be mothers, but Elaine was challenging these tropes three decades ago. That she was selfish in other areas had nothing to do with her wish to remain child free, in the way that she defied so many of the labels so often lobbed at women who do what they want: She was successful but not career-obsessed, she liked kids even though she didn’t want them, and she dated and slept with whomever she liked. In the same episode, Elaine convinced a boyfriend (Tim DeKay) to commit to a vasectomy.

Women choosing to be child free is one area in which pop culture still needs to catch up to the standard Elaine set.

She Was Fully in Charge of Her Sex Life—Including Her Contraception

Not only does the episode, “The Sponge,” put contraception front and center, it places it on such a pedestal that Elaine must deem her partners worthy of it. The episode aired in December of 1995 and spared no expense when it came to making a spectacle out of birth control sponges—though part of the joke is just how judgmental others were as Elaine stockpiled hers. Just eight years earlier, the LA Times wrote about how television was starting to openly discuss contraception—the word “condoms” was almost struck from a script. But then came Elaine, and she even coined a catchphrase: sponge-worthy.

Democratizing the topic of contraception for women on television, Elaine completely flipped the idea of sexual shame: Guys had to prove themselves in order to be blessed with everything sex entailed, including contraception. Are you worthy? Because she’s worth it.

She Had Style, She Had No Grace

The aforementioned episode “The Little Kicks” has, in the years since it first aired, become so iconic that the women of Broad City choreographed an entire tribute to it for Julia Louis-Dreyfus’s Mark Twain Award. Rumor has it that Larry David worried that the episode, in which we see Elaine dancing in what George refers to as “a full-body dry heave set to music,” would ruin Louis-Dreyfus’s career. It did the opposite, but it sure is memorable. This content is imported from YouTube. You may be able to find the same content in another format, or you may be able to find more information, at their web site.

There were inelegant women earlier in TV history: That Girl’s Ann Marie was a klutz, but she was cute. Chrissy Snow of Three’s Company was the stereotypical dumb blonde, but since that was presented as her whole personality, so her ditziness could be read as charming. Elaine Benes, though, was sharp, attractive, successful…and sometimes an absolute dumpster fire of a person.

Before “The Little Kicks,” a klutzy female character was often sidelined into the role of airhead or considered childlike. One cringe-y example can be seen in the I Love Lucy episode “Equal Rights,” in which Lucy and Ethel aim to become champions for women’s equality, only to be outdone by their clumsiness and lack of money, turning the whole plot point into a joke.

But because we had Elaine, we could later have Liz Lemon (Tina Fey). Lemon often played the klutz, but she could also be the straight man to her co-worker Tracy Jordan (played by Tracy Morgan). And even when she was extraordinarily socially awkward—in “The Ones,” her boss (Alec Baldwin) walks in on her in a Slanket (that’s a blanket with sleeves) singing about “night cheese”—she was literally running the show. She still got the job done. Truly, a woman for all seasons.

In retrospect, Elaine Benes wasn’t meant to be a symbol of hope or an icon for women. She was just one of four stars—three of whom were male. It shouldn’t have been revolutionary, but she avoided being the token gal pal. She applied the male gaze, flipped it, and reversed it. Today, we talk about so-called “bad feminists,” but Elaine nailed that thesis decades ago. She believed in the fundamental equality—for better or worse—of men and women. Without her, we might never have had 30 Rock, Fleabag, Shrill, or Parks and Recreation. And how boring would TV be then?

By not shackling Elaine to one stereotype, she could embody everything—even on a show about nothing.


For better or worse, Julia Louis-Dreyfus’s character was one of the first truly multifaceted TV heroines. By Farah Joan Fard Jul 2, 2019 Black, White, Black-and-white, Beauty, Lip, Monochrome, Monochrome photography, Photography, Eye, Photo shoot, Getty Images

It was July 5, 1989—30 years ago this week—when a TV show about nothing introduced America to one of the greatest female characters in sitcom history. Initially written as The Seinfeld Chronicles with a group of all-male leads, the show was picked up for production with the caveat that its creators, Jerry Seinfeld and Larry David, include a woman among the main characters. And so Julia Louis-Dreyfus as Elaine Benes danced across our screen in the still-hilarious-after-all-these-years Seinfeld.

While shows like That Girl, Mary Tyler Moore, and Murphy Brown paved the way for independent women characters on television, Elaine moved the ball forward in a different sense. Sure, she was beautiful and smart. But she was also problematic, imperfect, and unshakably outspoken even when she wasn’t one hundred percent sure about something. She had a soft spot for highfalutin art-house films and Greenpeace, but was uncouth and indelicate in the way that women actually are. Stopping for candy rather than rushing to meet her boyfriend at the hospital? Mary Tyler Moore would never! In short, Elaine was compelling because of a character trait that we now take for granted: She was unapologetic about the kind of self-centered behavior usually reserved for TV’s male players.

Elaine Benes, TV’s ur-antiheroine and a questionable role model, laid down the foundation for characters like Liz Lemon of 30 Rock, Robin Sherbatsky of How I Met Your Mother, and Annie of Shrill—women who are occasionally unkempt or annoying, who refuse to fit into the societal norms represented elsewhere on TV, and who, as a result, are sometimes painfully relatable.

So, in celebration of 30 years of Get! Out!s and pleas for a spare square, we ID’d five ways in which Elaine Benes completely changed the landscape for women on television. We owe her much. Or, as she might put it, “Here’s to those who wish us well, and those who don’t can go to hell.”

She Proved Being Bossy Isn’t Bad

Elaine’s pushiness, both physically and socially, is rumored to have been based on a friend and ex-girlfriend of Seinfeld’s. Elaine yells, she shoves, she towers as much as a person of 5’3” stature can. Her boyfriend, Puddy, calls her bossy. At one point, Jason Alexander’s George confesses that he’s scared of her. At the end of the notorious episode “The Little Kicks,” George’s father challenges her with a, “You want a piece of me?” She replies, “I could drop you like a bag of dirt,” and the scene ends on a freeze-frame of her swinging a punch

That Elaine Benes was the biggest boss of the friend group, yet bossiness remained peripheral to her character, just shows how truly badass she was. She was multidimensional—and some of those dimensions were intimidating!

Now, of course, tons of female characters stand up for themselves without making it some sort of heroic character arc. Monica Geller (Courtney Cox) on Friends, which hit TV screens in 1994, was the most intimidating character in the main cast, and her noted physical strength notoriously surpassed her male counterparts. In multiple episodes, Monica wrestles her brother, Ross, and it’s implied she beats her friend-turned-paramour Chandler at arm wrestling at least once (“The One with the Halloween Party”). Monica is a powerhouse, but it adds to (rather than contradict) her femininity and she’s not on some crusade.

The fact that they could have some magnificent traits and some downright detestable ones is a testament to how well they were written.

Later, the introduction of Robin Scherbatsky (Cobie Smulders) on How I Met Your Mother could have filled the generic, pretty girlfriend role. Instead, Robin possesses far more traits formerly given to stereotypical male characters in group comedies (and she’s far more convincing at it than Neil Patrick Harris’s unnecessarily sexual conquest-obsessed Barney Stinson): She smokes cigars, she loves guns, she puts her career first, and she doesn’t shy away from a bar brawl.

When Elaine throws a punch or Robin throws a barstool, it’s not set up as a uncharacteristically heroic gesture of a nice lady turned Wonder Woman—it tracks with their whole personality. Some of their qualities are even worth criticizing—Robin could be staunchly anti-other women, and who likes guns?! But the fact that these female characters could have some magnificent traits and some detestable ones simultaneously is a testament to how well they were written.

She Talked About Abortion on TV

In 1972, a year before Roe passed, the sitcom Maude—a spinoff of All in the Family—introduced an abortion storyline to its progressive titular character in “Maude’s Dilemma.” The episode was nearly yanked off the air. And, almost 50 years later, the topic is still considered bold for television (though this is slowly changing). But Maude’s abortion arc was treated with intensity and seriousness. On the contrary, Elaine’s argument is, though staunchly pro-choice, still goofy and slightly absurdist. (Part of the difference may be that Maude’s was about a main character choosing whether to get an abortion, and Seinfeld’s handling of the issue keeps it in the realm of the hypothetical, which makes it easier to joke about.) As Kramer later ends up shouting, “It’s not pizza until it comes out of the oven!”

In this year’s Shrill, the Aidy Bryant–led Hulu series based on Lindy West’s book of the same name, abortion is more of an inconvenience than a tragedy. It’s a key distinction that shows just how far we’ve come: In Seinfeld, abortion is brought up as nonchalantly as muffins or soup; Shrill kicks it up a notch, keeping our gaze with Bryant’s Annie as she undergoes the procedure. We hear the doctor narrating what’s going on so that Annie is aware of the process. She’s not distraught about or guilty for her decision. And yet, when her sometimes-boyfriend’s reaction to her choice is his own relief, Annie doesn’t let him off the hook—she points out that having a baby would have trapped him into “treating [her] like a human being.” Advertisement – Continue Reading Below

It’s a brilliant, nuanced take on abortion, and it’s possible that we would not be here, culturally, without characters like Elaine shouting her views from the rooftops.

She Was an Unapologetically Child-Free Woman

In a very ‘90s-TV-show turn of events, Elaine gets upset about her unmarried status when George gets engaged (“The Postponement”), but Seinfeld never focused Elaine’s story on trying to get a husband or have kids. In the episode “The Soul Mate,” Elaine sits among her female friends who pressure her to move to Long Island and “have a baby already,” as they’ve all done. Elaine’s defense: Why should she?

Suit, Formal wear, White-collar worker, Standing, Tuxedo, Businessperson, Gesture, Smile, Outerwear, Business,

Getty Images

It was refreshing to have a female character proudly confirm that she doesn’t need to have kids to be a complete and happy woman, especially because so many shows before and since have struggled with the topic. But while many characters are as wedding-obsessed as Jennifer Aniston’s Rachel Green on Friends (to whom we are literally introduced while wearing a wedding gown), there are occasionally those as proudly anti-kid as Samantha Jones, who even throws herself an I’m Not Having a Baby Shower.

She defied many of the labels so often lobbed at women who do what they want.

Advertisement – Continue Reading Below

Our society still stigmatizes and continues to ignore women when they say they don’t want to be mothers, but Elaine was challenging these tropes three decades ago. That she was selfish in other areas had nothing to do with her wish to remain child free, in the way that she defied so many of the labels so often lobbed at women who do what they want: She was successful but not career-obsessed, she liked kids even though she didn’t want them, and she dated and slept with whomever she liked. In the same episode, Elaine convinced a boyfriend (Tim DeKay) to commit to a vasectomy.

Women choosing to be child free is one area in which pop culture still needs to catch up to the standard Elaine set.

She Was Fully in Charge of Her Sex Life—Including Her Contraception

Not only does the episode, “The Sponge,” put contraception front and center, it places it on such a pedestal that Elaine must deem her partners worthy of it. The episode aired in December of 1995 and spared no expense when it came to making a spectacle out of birth control sponges—though part of the joke is just how judgmental others were as Elaine stockpiled hers. Just eight years earlier, the LA Times wrote about how television was starting to openly discuss contraception—the word “condoms” was almost struck from a script. But then came Elaine, and she even coined a catchphrase: sponge-worthy.

Democratizing the topic of contraception for women on television, Elaine completely flipped the idea of sexual shame: Guys had to prove themselves in order to be blessed with everything sex entailed, including contraception. Are you worthy? Because she’s worth it.

She Had Style, She Had No Grace

The aforementioned episode “The Little Kicks” has, in the years since it first aired, become so iconic that the women of Broad City choreographed an entire tribute to it for Julia Louis-Dreyfus’s Mark Twain Award. Rumor has it that Larry David worried that the episode, in which we see Elaine dancing in what George refers to as “a full-body dry heave set to music,” would ruin Louis-Dreyfus’s career. It did the opposite, but it sure is memorable. This content is imported from YouTube. You may be able to find the same content in another format, or you may be able to find more information, at their web site.

There were inelegant women earlier in TV history: That Girl’s Ann Marie was a klutz, but she was cute. Chrissy Snow of Three’s Company was the stereotypical dumb blonde, but since that was presented as her whole personality, so her ditziness could be read as charming. Elaine Benes, though, was sharp, attractive, successful…and sometimes an absolute dumpster fire of a person.

Before “The Little Kicks,” a klutzy female character was often sidelined into the role of airhead or considered childlike. One cringe-y example can be seen in the I Love Lucy episode “Equal Rights,” in which Lucy and Ethel aim to become champions for women’s equality, only to be outdone by their clumsiness and lack of money, turning the whole plot point into a joke.

But because we had Elaine, we could later have Liz Lemon (Tina Fey). Lemon often played the klutz, but she could also be the straight man to her co-worker Tracy Jordan (played by Tracy Morgan). And even when she was extraordinarily socially awkward—in “The Ones,” her boss (Alec Baldwin) walks in on her in a Slanket (that’s a blanket with sleeves) singing about “night cheese”—she was literally running the show. She still got the job done. Truly, a woman for all seasons.

In retrospect, Elaine Benes wasn’t meant to be a symbol of hope or an icon for women. She was just one of four stars—three of whom were male. It shouldn’t have been revolutionary, but she avoided being the token gal pal. She applied the male gaze, flipped it, and reversed it. Today, we talk about so-called “bad feminists,” but Elaine nailed that thesis decades ago. She believed in the fundamental equality—for better or worse—of men and women. Without her, we might never have had 30 Rock, Fleabag, Shrill, or Parks and Recreation. And how boring would TV be then?

By not shackling Elaine to one stereotype, she could embody everything—even on a show about nothing.


They may be as slo as Uncle Joe but the GOP got hur done!


What Marjorie Taylor Greene's Constituents Really Think of Her
CrazyTowns “Marjorie Taylor Green

No matter how dingy the politician is. The Republicans are slow to criticize another Republican. Sure, he is a pathological liar and may have attacked a few women, but Donald makes a good BLT. Matt Gaetz, showing pictures of naked women on the house floor? Sure it was inappropriate, but I heard they were tastful.

If crazy was an industry: Georgia’s Own Marjorie Taylor Green would be the CEO.

Marjorie Lazer Beam Green, has suggested the fires in California could have been started by “lasers or blue beams of light” shot down from space by allies of former Govenor Jerry Brown who were said to be in the solar energy industry, His allies just happen to be Jewish, to clear the path for the states bullet trains.

Green, suggested the mass murder in Las Vegas was staged. Questioned the authenticity of the 911 attack on the Pentagon and there are other outragious acts including the stalking of Alexandria Ocasio-Cortez. I could go on, but blue ink is expensive.

In the life of Representative Green, Comparing speaker of the House, Mama Pelosi’s, mask mandate on the House floor to the death of Jews during the Holocaust is just another day in her neighborhood.

The Repbulicans have a GREAT deal of respect for the Jewish community, someone will have to ask Kevin McCarthy and good ole Mitch McConnell why it took them five whole days to respond to Greens outrageous statement.

“Marjorie is wrong, and her intentional decision to compare the horrors of the Holocaust with wearing masks is appalling,” McCarthy finally wrote in a statement  released on Tuesday morning. “Let me be clear: the House Republican Conference condemns this language.”

House Minority Whip Rep. Steve Scalise said: he does not agree with these comments and condemns these comparisons to the Holocaust. Good ole Mitch, found Greene’s comments “outrageous” and “reprehensible.

The hiarchy of the GOP can now give each other high fives. Sure it took them a minute, but they got hur done!

CityFella

A year after George Floyd: A letter to my Black son


Keith Magee and his son, Zayden, in 2015.Keith Magee and his son, Zayden, in 2015.

Opinion by Keith Magee/CNN

Dear Son,

We are upon the first anniversary of a deplorable killing. Last May, outside of a grocery store in Minnesota, George Floyd — a Black man — was slowly, casually murdered by a White police officer. Floyd’s daughter, Gianna, is the same age as you — you could be playmates. That is how I know that Floyd certainly didn’t choose to “sacrifice,” as one politician put it , his life to the cause of racial justice, leaving her traumatized and fatherless. Sometimes, when I look at your beautiful face, I think of that little girl and my heart breaks.

My precious son, you came into my heart almost seven years ago as a gift that I know was heaven-sent. An endlessly curious, cheeky bundle of energy, you are brimming with self-confidence, slow to fret and quick to trust. You were lucky enough to be born in a country where dreams can come true, so they say, and I hope that this will be the case for you. But you were also born inside Black skin and in today’s America that is still, tragically, a burden to bear. Every day I pray for strength so that I may help you to carry that burden, make you proud of who you are, and teach you how to navigate the visible and invisible currents of racism.

More than anything else, I pray that I will be able to keep you safe. No child should have to know this, but as you start to roam beyond our contented, loving bubble you will encounter individuals who will see you as less than human because of the color of your outer layer. Some of them will even be the very people who have sworn to protect and serve you, and they will be armed.

We are descended from the Transatlantic African slave trade. From those who were transported here in chains more than 400 years ago and forced to toil land stolen from its Indigenous guardians. Since that time, Black and brown people have been fighting, first for our freedom and now for equality. You are not aware of it yet, but you carry the trauma of all this struggle within you, as do I. Many, many generations of our ancestors did not live to see their efforts rewarded, but sometimes something happens that is so deeply shocking it brings change in its wake. Sadly, that something is often the murder of someone who looks like you

In 1955 a 14-year-old Black boy called Emmett Till was tortured and killed by two White men in Mississippi. It was August 28 — the same date as your birthday — and the teenager had allegedly whistled at a White woman in a grocery store. Decades later the woman admitted the claim was a lie. A photograph of Till’s mutilated face generated a level of outrage across America that contributed to the emergence of the Civil Rights Movement (a high point of which, the momentous 1963 March on Washington, also took place on your birthday).

Till’s murder set your grandma on her own lifelong journey of anti-racist activism, through protest and journalism. She would be the first to admit that it hasn’t been enough; countless innocent lives have been lost or ruined by racial hatred since the lynching of Emmett Till.

Unlike in your favorite movies, in real life good rarely triumphs over evil after Black people are slain by law enforcement. However, Floyd’s murderer, Derek Chauvin was exceptionally unlucky — he got caught and he got punished. For here, at last, was a racist crime that the world couldn’t turn away from, thanks to the bravery of teenage Darnella Frazier , who filmed what happened. One day, no doubt, you will watch that harrowing video and you’ll understand why it sparked protest marches across the globe.

You’ll realize why you saw me crying over George Floyd’s death, and I hope you will say his name.

Although a jury convicted Chavin, that one man cannot carry the burden of every Black and brown life stolen by law enforcement. The fact that he was found guilty does not exonerate all the other past, present and future acts of police brutality. It doesn’t eradicate centuries of systemic racism, nor does it bring Floyd or any of the other victims back to their grieving families.

Policing in the US too often reflects the racism and divisions  that still pervade society, and the fact that many officers continue to treat us with hatred and fear should come as no surprise. However many “bad apple” officers we incarcerate, however many body cameras we impose on law enforcement, however much police reform we introduce, none of this will suffice.

We have to stem the flow of injustice starting within their hearts. I fervently hope that when you are an adult you will be able to look back on George Floyd’s murder, like that of Emmett Till, not just as an outrage, but as a major turning point, a harbinger of real equality. However, I fear that the potential of this moment to bring unity will be lost if my generation doesn’t act now to overcome racism and all its dire repercussions.

We urgently need to engage in an honest national conversation about our country’s past so that we can face up to it and move forward. Difficult as this may be, models such as South Africa’s Truth and Reconciliation Commission, assembled to deal with the abuses that happened during apartheid, show that it can be done.

Meanwhile, our local and national lawmakers should convene citizens’ assemblies, or charrettes, to bring together demographically representative groups of Americans to examine key contemporary issues impacted by race (for example, law and order, education and voting rights). This would enable citizens from across political and social divides to find common ground and recommend policies that lawmakers could then enact to eradicate racial inequality.

Perhaps, if you and your peers and allies carry on this work, your children and grandchildren will live in an America in which true justice is valued more highly than mere dreams. All police officers will look at people like us and think “protect and serve,” not “neutralize.

Healing will mean that Black and brown citizens who have been allowed to grow up free from the shackles of racial trauma will feel safe when they meet a police officer instead of fearing for their lives.

Being non-White will not equate with less access to decent health care and education, less financial security, less respect. The school-to-prison pipeline that currently afflicts our poorest, darkest communities will have been cut off and all young people will have hope for the future.

No one will ever view another human being as not quite equal because of the shade of their skin.

I believe this transformation will take decades, but if Floyd’s horrific death is to mean anything, let it mean this — real change starts now. Let Americans be unanimous in demanding it and hold each other’s souls accountable until we achieve it.

Coretta Scott King, the mighty widow of Dr. Martin Luther King Jr., once said, “Freedom is a never-ending process — you earn and win it in every generation.” For your sake, Zayden, I pray that my generation is up to the challenge

Love,Papa

Keith Magee is a theologian, political advisor and social justice scholar. He is Chair and Professor of Practice in Social Justice at Newcastle University (United Kingdom) and Senior Fellow in Culture and Justice at the University College London. While he was a visiting scholar at Boston University, he founded The Social Justice Institute in 2014, which remains the hub for his independent work and research. He is the author of Prophetic Justice: Essays and Reflections on Race, Religion and Politics. The views expressed in this commentary are his own. View more opinion at CNN.

4 Cruel Ways You Hurt Your Partner Without Saying A Word


1,081 Angry Mexican Woman Stock Photos, Pictures & Royalty-Free Images
Photo: Google

By: Resmaa Menakem/YourTango.com

Every day, you communicate far more to others than you ever actually say out loud. How? By giving off “vibes.”

Whether it’s the obviously annoyed sigh you toss at the barista who dared to take 30 seconds too long making your morning latte, or the long, lingering glance you subtly give the man on the train letting him know, “hello, there. I find you attractive,” all day, every day, your body language sends out nonverbal messages to friends, family, and colleagues (as well as strangers) that communicate loud and clear: Leave me alone. I’m busy. I’m friendly. I’m scared. I want you. Back off, jerk!

This nonverbal communication, or your “vibes,” impacts your relationships in powerful ways, and can often caused relationship problems that seem to arise out of nowhere when, in reality, they’ve been brewing all along.

This is nowhere more so than in our intimate relationships, where we often use nonverbal communication in dishonest, cruel, or passive-aggressive ways to hurt our partner and get what we want (or to punish our partners when we don’t).

Think you’re not guilty of hurting your partner with your own “bad vibes”? Don’t be so sure. I wrote my book “Rock The Boat” to help couples recognize the four most common variations of how they use their energy in seriously unkind and unloving ways.

When your partner hurts your feelings or you feel hurt in a relationship, always address these feelings with your partner.

If you think it would be of any help, seeing a couples therapist has worked for many and could work for both of you if you each put in the same amount of effort. If this will help you feel heard and help your mental health, it’s worth a try.

How do you ruin a relationship?

If you think you might have ruined your relationship and have noticed your relationship with your partner has turned unhealthy, it could be because you’ve stopped talking to your partner as much, have taken them for granted, stopped listening to them, and ignored them.

If you wanted to emotionally hurt your partner because they emotionally hurt you, it’s best to just break up with them. You can easily solve your problem and at the same time get what you want. However, if the relationship is unhealthy and toxic, break things off and save yourself from even more emotional trauma.

But according to relationship coach and psychologist Dr Wendy Lyon, there’s never a reason to emotionally hurt someone. “If you are upset about something, be clear, kind, and direct in your communication. Learn how to communicate and connect without hurting each other,” she says.

Here’s how you hurt your partner in 4 cruel ways (and how to support your partner in a better way).

1. You use the silent treatment.

Your partner takes an action or makes a choice… and you disapprove. So you send your sweetie a small, micro-aggressive energetic smack that conveys your contempt, lack of respect, and ultimate dismissal of them… all without using a single nasty word or a negative tone.

Your partner, who is deeply attuned to your energy, immediately picks up that vibratory message in their body — and feels your vibe intensely, like a punch in the gut (literally, they’ll suddenly feel sick or nervous in their stomach).

Yes, you said, “It’s fine. No big deal.” But your partner feels the disconnect between your vibe and your words… and it hurts. And, be honest, you meant it to.

Of course, when your partner reacts strongly to this wound from you, you feign ignorance, pretend you did nothing, and accuse them of overreacting.

Over time, most couples get better and better at this technique. You wound one another with the smallest movement, a slight change in posture, a look, or a minor change in their voice. That small, dismissive micro-aggressive gesture or facial expression conveys the message: I only love you when you do what I want. If you displease me, I’ll make you pay for it.

It’s the art of subtle cruelty; quiet violence that leaves no visible fingerprints. Your partner is left feeling attacked but can’t logically explain why or what happened.

2. You play the victim.

For those who like to maintain control without ever seeming controlling, the “victim vibe” is the technique of choice.

You tell your partner you want something and they don’t want to give it, whether that’s going to an event you’re eager to attend or make a purchase they find unnecessary. And so, you start in on them… arguing, badgering, sulking, wearing them down. Finally, they give in (usually begrudgingly or half-heartedly) and you get your way.

But that’s not enough for you — you want service with a smile! Instead of thanking them for acquiescing and then allowing them their honest feelings about how they came to do so, you retaliate by asking, “What’s wrong?” or “What’s going on?” and act like you’re the victim of their bad energy.

Frustrated, they say, “This is what you said you want. But now that you’re getting it, you’re still complaining? Still not happy? What the hell is wrong with you?”

Congratulations, you got what you want by ignoring your partner’s feelings, but now you get to make them the bad guy by acting like you’re the victim.

3. You’re an emotional bully.

With this approach, you’re not taking no for answer and instead of using silence, you’re taking the opposite approach and upping the volume of your words.

The goal is to pour a ton o energetic intensity on your partner and create a pressure cooker effect. Put the energetic squeeze on them until you get your way. Bully them. Nag them. Over-explain your point. Lecture. Talk too loud. Talk extra slow like they’re a half-deaf idiot child.

The message is clear — you won’t back off or ease the pressure they feel until you get what you want. By overpowering, you hook all sorts of extra negative baggage onto what should otherwise be a simple message.

Note that if you take things a step further and resort to physical violence, this is never okay. Domestic violence is a felony and is never acceptable under any circumstances.

4. You keep your partner in the dark.

You give your partner only part of what you know they want or need, especially in conversations. You offer just a taste of it, to hook them, and then you energetically withhold the rest to ensure that you retain control.

It’s a not-so-subtle power play made through your tone of voice, timing, and how much you do or do not engage with them.

And what is the “thing” they want and need that you withhold? Why, your love, affection, and attention, of course.

Your withholding looks like your partner trying to tell you about his day, you listen briefly, then change the subject before he finishes. It could also look like your partner asking to discuss something with you. You agree, but while she talks, you send texts, or surf the web, or check your email or you interrupt the conversation to make or take a less-than-urgent phone call.

You could also be pretending to pay attention, periodically saying “uh-huh” and “okay.” But really, you don’t care about the conversation (what they’re trying to tell you), and you’re letting them know with your bored tone and indifferent questions such as, “Who are we talking about, again?”

You also might say the right words — “I’m sorry” or “That must really hurt” or “Go on, I’m listening” — but in a bored or uncommitted or uncaring tone, or in an angry monotone: “Whatever. It doesn’t matter” or (the nastiest of all) “It’s fine.”

The vibe you send to them screams, “Oh, I care, and it does matter — a lot. But right now I’m angry, so I’m going to pretend I don’t care and refuse to engage with you. You won’t be able to do anything about my anger. I’m going to make you feel it for a while. Until I feel better, I will make you feel bad.”

Cities Are Woefully Unprepared for the Havoc of Climate Change


Columbus, Ohio, was one of the cities that cited financial constraints in its planning.Carol M. Highsmith/Buyenlarge/Getty Images

More than 40 percent have no adaptation plan, a global survey suggests.

Fiona Harvey/UK Gardian

One in four cities around the world lack the money to protect themselves against the ravages of climate breakdown, even though more than 90 percent are facing serious risks, according to research.

Cities are facing problems with flooding, overheating, water shortages, and damage to their infrastructure from extreme weather, which is growing more frequent as the climate changes. A survey of 800 cities, carried out by the Carbon Disclosure Project, found that last year about 43 percent of them, representing a combined population of 400 million people, did not have a plan to adapt to the climate crisis.

Budgetary restraints were cited as the key reason by about 25 percent of cities. Many are reliant on national governments for the funding needed to protect their infrastructure and vulnerable populations from these threats.

The survey found that last year 422 cities had 1,142 projects to adapt to the climate crisis yet to be financed, requiring about $72 billion in investment. The cost of water management projects alone that were yet to be financed was estimated at $22.6 billion.COVID-19 “opened many people’s eyes to the issue of resilience,” but “cities need funding to become more resilient places.”

Kyra Appleby, the global director of CDP, said: “Adaptation to the impacts of climate change  is trickier to finance than emissions action. There are enormous benefits from adaptation and resilience, but they don’t appear on the balance sheet. Only a fraction of recovery spending [from the coronavirus pandemic] is being put towards climate change, and even less towards adaptation.”

Installing renewable energy generation, such as solar panels, can generate a financial return, and energy efficiency projects begin to save money quite quickly, but the benefits of adapting to the impacts of extreme weather are less obvious and often more diffuse. 

As well as reducing the risk of disaster and damage from extreme weather events such as flooding or droughts, adapting and increasing resilience to climate breakdown carries many benefits for the public, including cleaner air and water. For instance, increasing or enhancing green spaces, such as parks and other public amenities, is one of the key ways for cities to adapt, and can also vastly improve public health and mental well being.

Places citing budgetary constraints as a barrier to adapting to the climate emergency included South end in England, Rio de Janeiro in Brazil, and Columbus, Ohio, in the United States, Appleby said: “It’s a really varied mix of cities across the world that are experiencing this as a problem.”

She said the experience of the COVID-19 pandemic, when cities were deserted during lockdowns, has made people more aware o their vulnerability to shocks. It has opened many people’s eyes to the issue of resilience and the huge interconnectedness of the planet,” she said. “But this needs the support of national government , and cities need funding to become more resilient places in the long term.”

Businesses may provide another source of funding for some adaptation projects. Three-quarters of cities surveyed by CDP were already working with businesses on sustainability issues, or had plans to do so within the next two years.

Appleby said some cities were adapting well to the climate crisis, including London, Bristol, Los Angeles and Athens. The Greek capital is turning roos green and planting trees to cool the overheated streets, while Bristol is constructing more than 10 miles (17km) of flood defenses.

There is a white lady in my house


It was the sixties, after the march on Washington and the passage of Civil Rights laws. America started to take a look at itself. In most cities in America, it isn’t uncommon to have a separate Catholic Church for Whites, Blacks and other cultures. In an attempt to integrate some of the churches, the hierarchy at my protestant church, ecouraged the leaders to ask the parishioners if they would visit other churches in the community.

My mother and her girlfirend visited a local white church. They were shocked after the first visit. Even though we lived in Cailfornia, my mothers roots were southern. At black churches, we dressed to the nines. In the sixities, it wasn’t uncommon for my mother to spend hundreds for a sunday look. So imagine her suprise, seeing parishioners dressed as if they were going shopping at the supermarket, no furs, no fancy hats. Many men wore suits, but not the suits, with the matching hats, shirts, cufflinks and shoes she was acustomed to seeing on any given Sunday. The ulimate for my mom, was seeing young boys in blue jeans at church.

She spent nearly the entire afternoon, sharing what she’s seen. For several Sunday’s, she brought witnesses to the white church. She also befriended a lady at the church. The woman, was raised in a Texas town a few miles from where my mother grew up.

It was a Saturday afternoon, when I first saw the white lady in our house. I was with my sister in law who was dropping me off and was going to pick up my brother. From the moment I entered, I could feel something was off. My brother greeted me, instead of pushing me into a wall or popping me in the head ,he said hello.

Being a fat boy, my first stop was the kitchen and there she was, a white lady standing next to our stove. She and my mother was talking, something about a pie. The white lady was the same height as my mother. She knew my name. I said Hi.

My mother, was just odd, from the way she stood, and that smile, who is this woman? and where is my mother! It gets worse, my brother is sitting at the kitchen table just-a-smiling at the lady. It was a weird smile. That was too much for me. I need someone I could recognize and went looking for my sister in law, however ,she was in the bathroom. Returning to the kitchen, there SHE was, someone who could be my mother,speaking in an exaggerated tone, overextending her vowels as if she were learning to speak english for the first time.

I start to laugh, the white lady is now leaving and my brother (also possessed) say’s, have a wonn-derr-full day. This sends me over the top. WTF? wonn-derr-full-day (I can bearly breathe by now) and he and my mother walks to the door and waves goodbye. Trust me when I say this. THEY AIN’T NEVER EVER! DONE THAT BEFORE!! In fact, a typical goodbye at my house was lock the door on your way out, bye.

The white lady leaves, the door closes behind her. They turn around, I’m guessing the possession part of the program is now over and they are both looking at me at the same time. I think I can see satan in their eyes. I feeling that I’m about to meet Jesus. I briefly considered screaming for the white lady, but my mother has fast hands, zero to choke hold in point three seconds. My brother want’s to kill me too but mom has seniority, she gets to kill me first.

It seems, I’ve embarressed them in front of the white lady. Forget, how silly they looked and sounded. Of course these were just thoughts in MY HEAD- even at eleven years old, I knew the dangers of blurting things out. There is rumor that I had other siblings who disappered after casually blurting things out.

My sister in law reappeared* she and my brother had an appointment across town. So he would have to dig my body up, and kill me again after our mom was done. As he and my sister in law were leaving , the phone rang and my mother had fresh white lady stories to share with her friends. I think the phone call saved my life. She had a lot to share . She went on about how nice the white lady was and how they lived within miles of each other and how the white lady spoke and the things they had in common.

*Turns out my sister in law, was hiding in the bathroom, laughing surpressing her laughter with a bath towel. She overheard every thing and said she felt sorry for me.

However unlike me, she blurted and my brother, her husband was not amused.

The attempt to intergrate the churches failed, I don’t know why. My mother and Sarah remained friends for years. They never visited each other, just spoke on the phone. I think they couldn’t handle the peer pressure from people of their generation.

CityFella

Let’s never go back to the office


4 Things You Can Do When the Office is Empty – Time Management Ninja

By: Drew Magary/SFGate

I had my first officially normal weekend last weekend. I took a trip to New York, on my own. I stayed in a hotel for the first time in 15 months. I walked the streets of Manhattan and Brooklyn without a mask on. On Friday, the day after the CDC cried out “F—K IT” and gave its blessing to the fully vaccinated among us, myself included, to freely roam about the American cabin without masks, distancing or pants, I’d say the masked/unmasked split in town was roughly 50/50. Everyone was cool with everyone about it. No one gave me any death stares, and I didn’t judge every mask wearer as some kind of ultra-woke hygiene theater addict. I ate inside a restaurant. I saw old friends and hugged them. I went inside one friend’s apartment, maskless, and everyone was totally comfortable. Rejoicing in a sense of earned relief. Earned happiness.

I know that not every other state has immediately conformed to that CDC mandate (California among them), but the die has been cast. If life isn’t back to normal yet where you are, it will be soon. In my case, this was the normal that I had been dreaming about for a long-ass time. So if you’re also fully vaccinated like me, that means congratulations are in order for you as well. You made it to The After, which begs the surprising question

What the f—k do you do now?

All throughout the pandemic, I heard about how this sudden plague gave America a rare opportunity to re-evaluate how it goes about its business. America didn’t need to have a spiritually dead imbecile as president. Sick Americans didn’t need to get stuck with outrageous hospital tabs. Cities didn’t need to spend 98.7% of their operating budgets on violent, lazy police forces. And no one should have had to waste two hours of their day listening to bad podcasts while stuck in traffic on their way to a job that barely covers the rent. All of those trials were standard operating procedure in pre-pandemic America, and all of them sucked donkey balls. The pandemic, and the election staged within it, served as a morbidly serendipitous occasion for the country to correct all that.

Has it? LOL f—k no. While Joe Biden won the presidency and has already far surpassed the admittedly low expectations I had for him, many of the people running our government and many of the people running our industries — two groups whose Venn diagram looks like a cramped Mastercard logo — are still super horny to get you back to all of the good old bad times. 

Your boss wants you back in the office or else you’re fired. And if you’re unemployed? Well then you better be grateful for any business’s generous offer of two bucks an hour, and don’t expect a humane unemployment check to come your way if you turn that offer down. We’re even getting a good old-fashioned crisis in the Middle East.

Americans are already balking at this regression, and with good reason. The vaccinated among us are coming to the collective realization that they’re being invited back to a life that, before the pandemic, wasn’t all that great. The trauma of the pandemic will last for generations, but the past year also forced American businesses and institutions to operate the way they should have started operating YEARS ago. It’s not like they invented Zoom because of the pandemic. It was already there. We’ve always had the technology to work remotely: to spend less time going to and from a windowless bullpen and more time actually living. 

Because Americans don’t have to be so close together. The Trump years clearly proved that we all need some time away from each other. And guess what? We can get that time apart. Americans don’t have to wedge themselves into cities and onto highways and constantly battle for space in a country that has a LOT of it. Americans don’t have to establish geologically firm school districts that help preserve a soft form of segregation in perpetuity. The suburbs and points beyond don’t have to be cultural wastelands and, in fact, are already well on their way to having valuable, diverse scenes of their own. And Americans don’t have to work for s—t pay when they know, to the dollar, how much area billionaires profited from all the pandemic suffering. Those luxe parasites can afford to pay people $25 an hour, if not more, and simply don’t want to. Don’t think the masses toiling below them haven’t noticed. 

And don’t think that powerful folks, such as America’s foremost whitesploitation artist J.D. Vance, haven’t noticed all the little people acting with fresh compassion for both themselves and others, and declared it to be the end of America’s collective sanity. PEOPLE ARE STILL WEARING MASKS AND NOT GOING TO THE OFFICE! WHAT IS HAPPENING TO THIS PLACE?! They would like all their inequality back right now, thank you very much. Anything else would be uncivilized. Crazy, even!

But I have a pretty firm grasp on what’s actually deranged now, and so do many of my fellow Americans. For example, I know that I was a happy anomaly in The Before. Before the pandemic, I already had the work/life balance that other Americans only got a sample of after the whirlwind came knocking. I’ve worked from home since 2012 and don’t have a boss bitching at me to come back to an office so that he can make sure I’m not taking unauthorized piss breaks. I’m paid well. I don’t have to commute, and my wife and I have all the digital resources in place at home to make e-school go relatively smoothly for our kids (when we were given the choice to send the kids back to in-person school two months ago, we declined; we’ll send them back in person in September.

So the normal I’m returning to is a normal that many other people did not, and will not, get to have. I have a relaxing life, although I didn’t achieve that state of professional and personal bliss without first enduring the miseries of commuting, being paid crappy junior level salaries, and nervously jumping from one freelance gig to the next; miseries that plagued Americans before 2020 and await them once more in 2021. I had to pay my dues, so to speak. Paying your dues is one of the main unofficial tenets of the American labor experience.

But who says paying your dues NEEDS to be baked into this life? There was always gonna be an acclimatization process to The After, but many people I know have had enough time and distance to prioritize what they should reacclimate to and what they should leave behind for good. I had more than one colleague at Defector up and move out of New York during the pandemic, and a few more on top of that are ready to do likewise. They’re hardly alone. Ten percent of Americans moved last year, either out of circumstance or because they realized that literal greener pastures awaited them.

Because who wants to deal with a country where you pay your dues only to get handed more of them? There are Americans who, for all their sweat and tears, and for all the unfathomable losses they’ve suffered at the hands of the pandemic, NEVER get to rise above all of the tedious bulls—t that comes with entering the workforce. These people deserve better, and they KNOW it now. They know that there’s a quieter, roomier life available to everyone. A better life. One that isn’t so goddamn exhausting at every turn, and one that this country can factually afford. So don’t be shocked when the normal that you and I get back to looks a little different from the normal you’re used to.

Homeless and the burden on the poor neighborhoods


Tide Starts To Turn Against The 'Crime' Of Being Homeless | Colorado Public  Radio

Once you’ve arrived to the Airport in Honolulu and drive East towards the hotels in Wakiki one of the first thing you’ll notice in a sea of homeless people. Hawaii (Population 1.4 million) has one of the highest rates of homelessness of any state in the country. Estimages range from 6500 to 6800 homeless in the state with over 4500 alone on the Island of Oahu.

The challenge for Cities are overwheming. In 2018, the Federal Court ruled, law enforcement cannot cite or arrest a homeless person for sleeping on public property if the city or county doesn’t have enough shelter beds.

People have stong feelings about the homeless and many believe the goverment has responsiblity to provide shelter. In Cailfornia, there is an statewide housing shortage, this isn’t new. The shortage began two decades ago. 39.78 million people currently live in the Golden State. Last year 136,000 people left the state and 22,000 moved to California. More people are leaving California than moving here, continuing a trend that coupled with fewer births has slowed the growth rate in the nation’s most populous state to a record low amid a pandemic that is reshaping its future.

The housing issue is extremly complex, its more than creating housing . Many of the homeless are actively employed,some earning more than one hundred thousand who are priced out of the housing market. The average rent in San Jose is $2500, to qualify the prospective renter, would need an income of $10,000 a month or $120,000 year. In addition, there are many other issues including location, and acclimation. There are hundreds of thousands of homeless people who have been homeless for four years or more.

A low minumiam wage and living wage plays a major role in the Nations Homelessness

Here is a sample of average Monthly Rent for a one bedroom Apartment in some of America’s Cities. From Apartment Guide.com April 2021and the current Minumum Wages in those cities.

Austin,Tx $1318 PM/ MW $7.25 Baton Rouge, La $970 PM/ MW $7.25 Buffalo, NY $1415PM/ MW $12.50 Kansas City, Ms $1435PM/ MW $7.25 Orlando, Fl $1492 PM/MW $7.25 Sacramento, Ca $2035 PM/MW $15.00 Virginia Beach, Va $1412PM/ $7.25MW Wichita,Ks $815PM/ MW $7.25

The issue for many individuals is more than housing. Its psycological.

For some the transition from living outdoors to living indoors is too difficult. After years of living on the street, find indoors too confining. Many states do not offer mental health facilities to assist homeless with the transition. Mental health facilities would be benificial in assisting a section of the homelesss community to e cope with society, learning to interact with the public after years or months of social isolation from of living a life of survival, where you always on defense.

NIMBY

While most people feel strongly about the homeless, they dont want the homeless in their neigherhood. Not In My Back Yard. Issues of the poor often fall on low income communities. The quick solution for many city leaders is placing temporary housing or housing projects in low income areas. Those projects more often than not, have a negative affect on property values and crime in these neighborhoods. Large housing projects for the poor have failed all over the United States. However there has resistence to building affordable market rate housing throughout the city.

The Housing shortage has several pieces. The first is the need for immediate nightly shelter. Then, short term transitional housing, and then long term. The cities could create ordinances that would require 10% of apartment to be permanent market rate.

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How do people become homeless?

Top reasons people become homeless:

42.5% Lost job or economic issues
20% drugs or alcohol use
17% divorce or separation
15% an argument with a family member who asked them to leave
7.5% eviction
10% mental health or physical health issues

What are the largest barriers to obtaining permanent housing?

63% Can’t afford rent
37% Do not have an income
19% Do not have the funds for moving costs
18% Say the housing process is too difficult
15% Cite no available housing

What could prevent homelessness?

When asked what would have prevented their homelessness, respondents reported:
34% employment assistance
31% rental assistance
28% drug or alcohol counseling
19% mental health services

Recently, attention has been focused on the ecological impact of homelessness. Trash, human waste and other refuse from homeless encampments pollute waterways and our public city spaces. Since public restrooms and trash receptacles are limited, and because many businesses prohibit the homeless from accessing restrooms, People Experiencing Homelessness are forced to use whatever location they can find to dispose of their trash and other waste. This phenomenon results in a public health hazard and contributes to additional city costs. StreetTeam.org

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The cost to manage the homeless in america is in the millions.

FRESH NOT FROZEN: New York state probe of Trump Organization is now criminal -attorney general


Former U.S. President Donald Trump speaks at the Conservative Political Action Conference (CPAC) in Orlando, Florida, U.S. February 28, 2021. REUTERS/Octavio Jones

REUTERS

The New York state attorney general’s office said on Tuesday it has told the Trump Organization its investigation of the company run by former President Donald Trump is now a criminal probe, not purely civil.

Manhattan District Attorney Cyrus Vance, a Democrat, has been investigating Trump’s pre-presidency business dealings for more than two years.

“We have informed the Trump Organization that our investigation into the organization is no longer purely civil in nature,” spokesman Fabien Levy said in a statement. “We are now actively investigating the Trump Organization in a criminal capacity, along with the Manhattan DA,” he said.

The Trump Organization could not immediately be reached for comment.

Vance’s office has said in court filings it was investigating “possibly extensive and protracted criminal conduct” at the former president’s Trump Organization, including tax and insurance fraud and falsification of business records.

Vance’s probe began after Trump’s former lawyer and fixer Michael Cohen paid hush money to silence two women before the 2016 election about claimed sexual encounters with Trump.

That probe has accelerated since Republican Trump lost his bid for a second term to President Joe Biden, a Democrat.

New York State Attorney General Letitia James, also a Democrat, is leading a separate criminal probe into whether Trump’s company falsely reported property values to secure loans and obtain economic and tax benefits.

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